Where to Shop in Madrid

Don’t forget to take a piece of Madrid home with you—a Spanish fan, a pair of espadrilles or flamenco shoes, olive-oil soap. Follow the locals and browse chic designer clothing on Calle de Fuencarral or Calle Serrano. There’s no shortage of shopping, only space in the luggage.

Terraza Mercado de San Antón, Calle de Augusto Figueroa, 24, 3ª planta, 28004 Madrid, Spain
Madrid’s multi-level Mercado San Anton is a sight to be seen. Rows of gorgeous produce, local specialties, Italian deli favorites, briny seafood and locally-farmed meats line the perimeter of each floor, each stall more enticing than the one before it. Even better, its high tables and counters make it well-suited for a quick bite and glass of wine. For a relaxed sit-down meal, head up to the restaurant on the rooftop terrace and finish off the evening with a drink in the lounge.
Calle del Conde de Miranda, 1, 28005 Madrid, Spain
If you’re in Madrid and in the mood for tapas, you might not know exactly where to go or what to taste. The Mercado San Miguel (metro Sol) takes away all that decision-making by providing you with a taste experience all under one roof. The old, derelict market was renovated just a few years ago and turned into an upmarket culinary emporium of sorts. It has more than 30 food stalls, each selling something different. My favorite is the bellota ham sold at Carrasco, but there is plenty more. You can sample sherries and Rioja wines at the wine bar, or do as Spaniards do and pick away at tapas as you make your way through the market. I highly recommend the croquettes, or croquetas, in one of the outside alleys: they have ham, chicken, shrimp, cheese and a variety of others. The more standard tapas area easy to find, like tortilla, and seafood is beautifully laid out for you to pick and choose. Right in the middle is my top-rated tapa place. I couldn’t find a name for it but it’s the largest counter, shaped like a U, and has everything from potatoes aioli to steamed razor clams, with everything in-between.
Calle Badajoz, 31, 28931 Móstoles, Madrid, Spain
One of the biggest flea markets that I have ever been to is located in Madrid, Spain. El Rastro is an old neighborhood that is teeming with activity, but the place really comes alive on Sunday mornings for the weekly flea market. You can buy just about anything that you can think of here. If you’re not in a shopping mood however, its great for browsing, photographing and even finding some fantastic Spanish food to enjoy while you breathe in the market’s atmosphere.
45 Calle de Fuencarral
Mercado Fuencarral is a fresh and funky shopping center carrying brands like Paul Frank, Topman, and Ugly Shop. Fuencarral Street is home to many cool shops, but this two floor market takes it to another level. With stores spilling out into the aisles, everything from hand knit beanies to gas masks are tastefully and artistically displayed.
17 Calle León
In the heart of Madrid lives Don Flamenco, one of the oldest names in Flamenco shoes. Aside from turning out hand crafted shoes that would make any ballerina jealous, The Don also sells traditional clothing, castanets, and all things related to the art of Flamenco. The charming window display will entice you to enter.... give in! But don’t be dismayed if there is a wait to make your purchase -- lots of locals come to buy outfits and accessories for themselves.
Calle de Fuencarral, 122, 28010 Madrid, Spain
Like a moth to the flame, I was drawn to Kling while walking towards Sol. Hipster chic, preppy, and sexy intermingle seamlessly in the store, which is centered around a non-functioning antique popcorn machine. Everything about this place is sleek and suggestive. With a full selection of women’s clothing and shoes from the artsy to the office, as well as mens clothing - one would be hard pressed not to walk out with at least one item.
Calle de la Princesa, 64, 28008 Madrid, Spain
Calzedonia is the name in luxe leggings in Madrid at the moment, and there’s no questioning why. Faux snake skin sits on the shelf next to metal studs, delicate lace, polka dots, and an assortment of daring fashions. An easily packed souvenir, leggings are the perfect addition to any traveler’s suitcase.
Puerta del Sol, 12, 28013 Madrid, Spain
What is more romantic than an intricate and well-used Spanish fan? Fans are a highly personal item, and like perfume, one should only use the best they can find (or so my mother always said). For the royal minded there is only one choice, Casa de Diego. Founded in 1858, this a business steeped in international approval, and the generations have been privileged to create masterpiece shawls, umbrellas, and of course fans for royal families all over the world. Proudly facing the Puerta del Sol is the window display of fans, giving only a glimmer into the magic on the other side of the doors. Right outside is the hustle and bustle of city center, but inside the shop you are transported to a haven of beauty. Take home a piece of Spanish tradition with you, and smile every time you fan yourself, remembering Madrid.
Calle del León, 11, 28014 Madrid, Spain
Ad Hoc blends fashion and flowers seamlessly. When I entered the shop, intrigued by the stack of suitcases propping open the front door, I was greeted by the smile of Clara, the owner, who acknowledged me with an “hola” but did nothing to pressure my shopping experience. Vintage, hand made, one of a kind clothing items made by Clara hang on metal wire against a teal wall with half the paint purposefully etched off. Thistles bloom in a tall metal vase, and the entire shop smells exactly like a clean Spring morning. As I was admiring the perfume collection, Clara got up from the desk and asked me to watch the shop for a moment while she went to grab her lunch. She came back a few minutes later laughing “That’s like the typical Spanish, isn’t it?!”. Yes, yes it is, Clara! Visit Ad Hoc and see for yourself what typical Spanish looks like. A truly great experience. Image courtesy of Adhoc.
Calle de Goya, 87, 28001 Madrid, Spain
The high end department chain, El Corte Ingles carries all essentials and is a one stop shop for any items forgotten at home. Everyone in Spain knows El Corte Ingles to be a bit pricy, but with good reason: the staff, selection and hours of operation give them quite the advantage. The flagship location Calle Raimundo Fernández Villaverde, 79 is known as the go-to store for having the most name brand shopping under one roof: Louis Vuitton, Hermes, Versace, Hugo Boss, Dolce and Gabbana are just a few you’ll find waiting.
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