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Sitka National Historical Park

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Sitka National Historical Park
Kayak view
Sitka National Historical Park
Sitka National Historical Park
There's a strong desire to go quiet at Sitka National Historical Park. The site of an 1804 battle between the Kiks.ádi Tlingit people, who had been there for centuries, and Russian traders who wanted to control the area. A great deal of blood spilled on this soil. The place demands respect. Wander down the trails lined with spruce and hemlock, and marked by totem poles, each one with its own history and story. Watch master carvers keep the Tlingit arts alive with the creation of new totem poles and seaworthy boats. Nearby buildings include the Russian Bishop's House where you can see relics of the Russian occupation of the land. Don't miss the nearby Sheldon Jackson Museum, which houses an astonishing collection of pieces from many Native Alaskan cultures.
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Kayak view
From the kayak, the Sitka harbor was peaceful, serene and full of wildlife.
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Sitka National Historical Park
Located at the site of the Battle of Sitka, the last major battle between Russians and Native Alaskans, the Sitka National Historical Park is Alaska’s oldest federal park, established by President Harrison in 1890. It’s also the smallest national park in Alaska, measuring just 113 acres. At the visitor center, you can find Russian and indigenous artifacts; the two-kilometer-long Totem Trail meanders past 18 totem poles before reaching the site of a former Tlingit fort near the Indian River.
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