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The Frick Collection

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The Frick Collection New York New York United States
Old Masters in Manhattan New York New York United States
The Frick Collection New York New York United States
The Frick Collection New York New York United States
Old Masters in Manhattan New York New York United States
The Frick Collection New York New York United States
The Frick Collection
The phrase "jewel box" may be overused when referring to exquisite galleries and museums, but there's no better way to describe the Frick Collection, at 70th Street and Fifth Avenue. The early-20th-century neoclassical mansion facing Central Park, designed by Carrère and Hastings (who were also responsible for the main branch of the New York Public Library), was the residence of industrialist Henry Clay Frick before being converted to a museum after his death. Most of the works on display were acquired by Frick and his wife during their lifetimes, and are predominantly paintings by European old masters—Boucher, Holbein, Fragonard, Reynolds, Van Dyck, and others. The museum is arranged, however, much as it would have been during the Fricks' day, with antique furniture sitting in the rooms where the paintings are hung.

Old Masters in Manhattan
Head up Fifth Avenue from Loews Regency and the first museum you'll hit will be the Frick Collection, at 70th Street. This small museum houses one of the preeminent collections of works by Old Masters, counting important paintings by Hals, van Dyck, Boucher, and Goya among its holdings. The museum is housed in the former home of industrialist Henry Clay Frick, and preserves the decor of an especially lavish turn-of-the-last-century mansion. If you want to continue north for more culture, the Met at 82nd marks that start of Museum Mile, with nine museums along Fifth Avenue up to 110th Street.

The Frick Collection
Start your day at the Fifth Avenue Belle Epoque mansion of Henry Clay Frick and his wife, Adelaide, was opened as a public museum in 1934, but it still retains the intimacy of a private home. Entering the house—with its Aubusson-carpeted hush—is like walking into a life-sized jewel box. Everything shines, most especially The Progress of Love, the four paneled Rococo masterpiece by Jean-Honoré Fragonard which has been described as "one of the most powerful evocations of love in the history of art." The panels were commissioned by the famous courtesan Madame du Barry but rejected because the lover portrayed on canvas looked too much like Barry’s real life suitor, Louis XV.

www.frick.org

Photo courtesy the Frick Collection

1 E 70th St, New York, NY 10021, USA
+1 212-288-0700
Sun 11am - 5pm
Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm
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