Enchantment Resort, Sedona
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Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Enchantment Resort, Sedona
Sitting at the entrance to a secluded red-rock canyon eight miles outside of Sedona, Enchantment Resort may be the Southwest's most visually stunning accommodation. And while the indigenous people who originally inhabited the canyon had more elevated views—their cliffside dwellings are visible to anyone who can tilt their head far enough back—it's doubtful that even they appreciated the scenery more than travelers arriving from worlds of gray skies and cacophonic congestion. There are numerous guest rooms and configurations, all in a pueblo style and done in a red-rock hue blending so well with the surrounding canyon that guests who've given into the lunchtime temptation of a second prickly pear margarita at Tii Gavo would do well to carry a resort map. (Which is handy anyway for the many hiking options.)
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Neighborhood Vibe
The eight-mile drive to Sedona, with its New Age vibe (think vortexes and tarot readings), encourages many guests to happily spend most of their visit without leaving the resort. But the dining, shopping, and entertainment prospects of a trip into town are many. If nothing else, visit Tlaquepaque, a shopping area whose architecture is convincingly Mexican village–style. On the way in or out, stop at the Heartline Café for such healthy fare as the local farm-raised pecan-crusted trout. For more ambitious day-trippers, the South Rim of the Grand Canyon is 119 miles north of Sedona. (And Phoenix is almost the same distance south.)
Need to Know
Rooms: From $315 low season, $575 high season. 218 rooms, available in various layouts.
Check-in: 4 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options: It's hard not to start by describing the views at the resort's signature restaurant, Che-Ah-Chi, whose floor-to-ceiling windows look out on the steepest part of the canyon walls. The menu is chef David Schmidt's interpretation of seasonal American cuisine—although when is beef tenderloin not in season? More informal, and more Southwestern, along the lines of green chili pork or chicken tinga, is Tii Gavo. There are spa and golf club dining venues, too.
Spa and gym details: With 16 guests rooms and suites of its own, the 24,000-square-foot Mii Amo Spa is an all-inclusive spa resort within a resort. Its treatments and its architecture are inspired by its natural setting and by the culture of the people who first inhabited it. It has an indoor and outdoor pool, café, library, fitness room, and movement studio, all of which are open to Enchantment guests.
Insider Tips
Who's it for: Guests who are awed by overwhelming natural beauty, but don't express it by shouting.
Our favorite rooms: In one of the more private casitas that sit high on the elevated ground toward the back of the resort, the one-bedroom suite 111B has a private pool and the best of those overwhelming views.
Special privilege: Although Enchantment's layout, compressed by the canyon, has never allowed for a golf course, in 2013 the resort's owners took over management of nearby Seven Canyons, an 18-hole course which itself is in an exceptionally beautiful red-rock setting. The Tom Weiskopf–designed course is now open only to club members and Enchantment guests.
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