Top Restaurants in Prague

Prague’s restaurant and nightlife scene has never been better. From centuries-old beer halls to speakeasies, from traditional Bohemian cuisine to vegetarian locavore fare, there’s no end of delis, restaurants, cafes, and bars to try.

Highlights
Pernerova 49, Karlín, 186 00 Praha 8-Karlín-Praha 8, Czechia
This restaurant-bakery combo was the first of its kind in the city and it definitely raised the bar for the dining scene. The menu, including breakfast, lunch and dinner, is inspired by neo-Nordic cuisine with a Czech twist, and the farm-fresh ingredients are brought in daily. The lunch menu made up of dishes such as spelt, red pepper, and cottage cheese, while on dinner menu you’ll find potatoes in ash, smoked fish, dried egg yolk, and kefir, or dry-aged beef tenderloin with onions and marrow. If you’d like to stay a while, opt for the chef’s selection of five dishes selected just for you, or the eight-course tasting menu. Set on two floors in one of the converted factories in Prague’s once industrial Karlin district, Eska’s has an industrial vibe with high ceilings, massive windows, and exposed pipes.
Dlouhá 33, 110 00 Praha 1-Staré Město, Czechia
Lokal, traditional Czech pubs brought into the 21st century, has five locations across Prague. Owned by a high-end restaurant group that also owns Nase Maso, a butcher shop focused on Czech heritage breeds, and other local favorites, Lokal serves authentic, hearty, but top quality Czech fare such as dumplings, fried cheese, and pork knuckle. The beer is also tops, served fresh from the taps (the exposed tanks are a highlight of the décor) and a good way to keep up with the Czechs who are Europe’s largest consumers of pivo (beer) per capita.
Křižíkova 386/105, 186 00 Praha 8-Karlín, Czechia
This corner café in Prague’s foodie hub, Karlín, is always hopping. The painted brick walls, wood tables, cozy corners, but especially the coffee the keeps people coming back. Muj Salek Kavy translates as “my cup of coffee” (a play on my cup of tea) is owned by local direct trade coffee company Doubleshot, which was among the first to kick-start the city’s now booming specialty coffee scene. They select and roast their own in-season beans, and serve their single origin, as well as espresso blends, at the right temperature. On weekends in summer the lively atmosphere spills out onto the streets, and on the weekends, be sure to show up early to get a seat for the delicious brunch, with dishes like rice porridge with coconut milk and apricots, blueberry jam pancakes, and poached with Prague ham and horseradish sauce.
Křemencova 11, 110 00 Praha 1-Nové Město, Czechia
With a history dating back to 1499, U Fleků is a Prague institution and the only brewery and restaurant in Central Europe that has been brewing non-stop for over five centuries. Beer lovers, backpackeres and tourists come from all corners of the world to drink their dark lager which is the only beer on the menu, made with all natural ingredients. The restaurant, serving traditional Czech and Bohemian cuisine – roast pork knuckle, garlic soup, apple strudel – includes eight beer halls (each with its own distinctive décor) and an inner beer garden that seats up to 500 people. Everyday U Fleků serves around 2,000 pints of beer. If you want to know more, they also have a brewey tour and a beer museum (reservations only) in the former malt house.
Krakovská 15, 110 00 Nové Město, Czechia
Just off Wenceslas Square, Parlour is not easy to find. There is no sign, and once inside there is no menu. But the self-proclaimed cocktail artists at this small, cozy speakeasy-style bar have earned the title, and if you don’t what you want, they will help you figure it out. Sip yours out of vintage glasses while sitting at the small bar or in comfortable club chairs. Reservations can be made for four people max.
115 Křižíkova
On Karlin’s impossible to pronounce Krizikova street (where the neighborhood’s foodie scene is most visible), this inviting wine bar was among the venues to solidify the foodie scene here. Led by oenophile and poet Bogdan Trojak, Veltlin offers natural wines (what they prefer to call authentic wines) from the former Austro-Hungarian empire with a diversity of blends from the Czech Republic’s Moravian and Bohemian regions to Croatia and Austria. You can check the menu online to see the day’s open bottles on offer. A local illustrator is behind the whimsical map of the former empire adorning one wall.
Boršov 280/2, 110 00 Staré Město, Czechia
Lehka Hlava, which means “clear head,” has been a mainstay on the steadily growing vegetarian scene in Prague since 2005 and features an interior that can be only described as magical. One room is painted deep blue with stars. Another is purple with a lizard painted on the wall and has tabletops of colored glass. Along with freshly made juices, they serve lemonades, non-alcoholic cocktails, and samurai shots of Asian teas, as well as wine, beer, and cider. The menus change regularly and incorporate seasonal ingredients and produce.
Haštalská 753/18, 110 00 Praha-Staré Město, Czechia
At this Michelin-starred restaurant, food is a performance art and the results deserve a standing ovation. That said, this is Prague, so although the food and presentation are comparable to other first-class dining experiences in Europe, the vibe and the service isn’t stuffy at all. At La Degustation Boheme Bourgeoise, the ingredients sourced from local producers, are based on the recipes penned by the famous 19th-century cookbook writer, Marie B. Svobodová, author of Cookery School. The eight-course menu is punctuated by interstitial amuse bouches and paired with Central European, French, and Italian wines, as well as cucumber, sour cherry, and red currant juice; recent menu courses include beetroot with licorice goat kefir, kohlrabi with whey and nutmeg, and duck with pear and cinnamon.
Ovocný trh 19, 110 00 Praha-Staré Město, Czechia
Prague’s Grand Café Orient is the only cubist-designed space of its kind in the world. It occupies the first floor of the House of the Black Madonna, designed in 1911 by modernist architect Josef Gočár. Renovated in 2005, the spacious café retains the original silk-shaded hanging brass lanterns and marble-topped buffet-bar. Diners can enjoy such menu highlights as Prague ham and apple strudel or tartar of smoked salmon with black caviar and lettuce, and then visit the Museum of Czech Cubism upstairs.
Prague 6, Czechia
While farmers’ markets have sprung up all over Prague, the Dejvice Farmers Market that sprawls out near the Dejvická metro station is the most popular because of its location and size, plus its fun fair atmosphere. On Saturday mornings, local vendors and farmers from the countryside set up their stands and offer a wide range of fruits, vegetables, juices, bread, pies, wines, and even fresh fish and oysters.