Spain’s Hidden Cities

While Spain is one of the world’s top travel destinations, it still has many secret spots yet to be discovered by the masses. Here’s a collection of my favorite and best Spanish cities that you may never have heard of.

A village unlike any other in the world, Combarro is a mystical seaside town that has a single narrow road winding through it. On both sides of this souvenir alley are different witch objects for sell, along with the city pride and joy: Orujo - a type of Brandy - which is sold in flavors from rice pudding, almond, coffee, and black cherry. It is said this is a magical city where witches still reside, the people all have a twinkle in their eye and are friendly from the bottom of their hearts. It’s a truly warming experience to visit Combarro. Photo by Guillen Perez/Flickr.
Calle de los Hermanos Becerril, 10, 16004 Cuenca, Spain
Like something out of a storybook, the drive to Cuenca winds you up a steep hill upon which are resting a series of wooden houses, stacked like crooked books and precariously perched-- they beckon you. Cuenca’s elevation makes the views amazing and the sunsets are perfectly watched from the square behind the church. Make sure you enjoy lunch in the main square and listen to the toll of the bells which send birds scattering in every direction, adding an eery charm to the place. All of the restaurants in the main square will offer a menu del dia - menu of the day - which will include two courses, dessert and a drink and offer you several hours of relaxation an indulgence for a truly authentic Spanish experience. Take your pick! Photo by Gabriel Villena/Flickr.
Unnamed Road
The walk to Sacromonte is a bit nerve-wracking since the pedestrian lanes and sidewalks disappear from time to time, and there are several blind curves, but it is worth all the adventure. Walking alongside whitewashed houses with large succulent gardens while staring at the Alhambra, you really begin to understand what life is like in Andalucia. If you persist uphill to the church you will enjoy an incredible, breathtaking view; this is still one of my best memories of Granada. Be sure to check out a flamenco show in one of the caves at night - the atmosphere is incredible, passionate, and simply Spanish. Photo by Maximo Lopez/Flickr.
Cariño, A Coruña, Spain
The wind carried us up and past Cariño to Cape Ortegal, where we looked out over the end of the world (and clung to the lighthouse like scarecrow on a stick in the middle of a Tornado). Experiencing the cape in a relentless storm was something I’ll never forget - there were more than a few people unwilling to step out of their vehicles to brave the wind and rain that day - but it’s this view of little Cariño that I’ll never forget. I certainly won’t forget falling down the hill after taking this photo. A tumble never hurt anyone permanently.
Spain
Would-be ghost-hunters will enjoy a tour of this abandoned village in Tarragona province a little over an hour’s drive from Barcelona. Left completely deserted after the end of the Spanish Civil War, crumbling homes, a church in ruins, and empty tombs are overgrown with weeds and brush in this isolated village located a half hour hike from the nearest paved road. While there have been rumors of strange goings-on for years, after a dead body turned up on the scene in the early nineties, Marmellar became an urban legend of sorts.
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