Where to Eat Éclairs in Paris

At once simple and incredibly complex, the ubiquitous French pastry can be found all over Paris. But if you’re really looking for an experience, check out one of these renowned pâtisseries.

51 Rue Montorgueil, 75002 Paris, France
While the rum-soaked baba au rhum cake originated at Stohrer pâtisserie and is a classic, it’s the éclair au chocolat and the seasonal flavors (this winter’s include both salted caramel and chestnut cream) that deserve special attention. So do the majestic frescoes by artist Paul Baudry (famed for his décor in the Palais Garnier opera house) that adorn the shop’s walls and ceiling.

It also happens to be one of the oldest patisseries in Paris, and is absolutely worth dropping by on your next trip to the city for one of their delicious sweets.
32 Rue Notre Dame des Victoires, 75002 Paris, France
At his éclair-focused shop in the Marais, Christophe Adam presents riffs on traditional recipes in eye-popping colors and exotic flavors. You may be tempted by the best-selling Chocolat Grand Cru, but don’t overlook the more off-beat seasonal varieties. This winter, expect to find Spanish nougat (turrón) and a limited-edition gift collection. This appeared in the November/December 2014 issue.
228 Rue de Rivoli, 75001 Paris, France
What kind of hotel might attract such diverse guests as Pablo Picasso and Elizabeth Taylor, Mata Hari and FDR, Queen Victoria and Jay-Z, Tchaikovsky and the Olsen Twins? The answer is Le Meurice. Opened in 1815 as one of the world’s first five-star hotels, this icon near the Tuileries Garden has long appealed to both the posh and creative sets; its ties to the art world are particularly strong, having hosted Picasso’s wedding dinner and served as Salvador Dalí’s Parisian pied-á-terre for over 30 years.

For recent renovations of the public spaces, interiors guru Philippe Starck and his designer daughter, Ara Starck, took inspiration from Dalí for some of the more playful touches (like the quirky portraits of 18th-century personalities painted on the backs of leather seats). In the 118 rooms and 42 suites, designer Charles Jouffre maintained a French classical style, with traditional and antique furnishings, rich fabrics, Garnier Thiebaut linens, deep-soaking tubs, and—in higher-category rooms like the Pompadour Suite—oak floors and fireplaces.
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