The Best Shopping in Puerto Rico

You want variety? Puerto Rico’s shops and boutiques have got variety! Cigars, ice cream, must-haves for the beach, handicrafts, vintage clothes, antiques, housewares—shoppers beware.

6 Cll Sol, Rincon, PR 00677
Looking for something really unique to bring back from your time spent in Puerto Rico? Grab a t-shirt from Uncharted Studio (or a trucker hat, a bag, some stickers...). Established in 2005, this place put custom silk screening shirts on the map for Rincon. They use 100% ringspun cotton tees for a nicer quality and feel. and their printing solvents are non-chemical, soy and citrus based. Talk about eco-minded! This is something you want to support! Your trip to Rincon is not complete without stopping here for a t-shirt!
316 Calle Fortaleza, San Juan, 00901, Puerto Rico
When I first found this store, I was overwhelmed. This place holds so many treasures, you’ll need several trips to look through everything. Franky’s is one of the most popular thrift/vintage stores in Puerto Rico, and likely only one of a few. The proprietor provides a lot of his items as props for movies being filmed in PR—like the recent Rum Diaries movie. If you like vintage, then you’ll love shopping here. It’s on the corner of San Francisco Street, right behind the little plaza as you enter Old San Juan.
207 Calle San Francisco, San Juan, PR 00901
Concalma is the store of designer Matilsha Marxuach, a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design who creates fair-trade products that are made and sourced locally. Her specialty is chic cloth bags and totes for men and women, and her trendy line offers a variety of sizes, styles and designs. Clothing, bags and jewelry by other designers, both quirky and cutting-edge, are sold here as well.

201 Calle de Tetuan, San Juan, 00901, Puerto Rico
Shop for an authentic souvenir in Everything but Match, a store inspired by a T-shirt line designed by the owners’ 6-year-old daughter. In this shop in Old San Juan, you’ll find original art, accessories, and children’s clothing made by local artists and artisans. From unique jewelry to brightly colored throw pillows, you’re sure to fall in love with something unique to bring home in your suitcase.
154 Calle del Cristo, San Juan, 00901, Puerto Rico
Looking for a uniquely Puerto Rican souvenir? Check out El Galpon, a shop that specializes in high-quality panama hats and cigars. You’ll also find a good selection of santos, the hand-carved wooden saints that are ubiquitous in Puerto Rican churches and households.

493 Km. 0.7, Hatillo 00659, Puerto Rico
This woman-owned artisanal aged-cheese producer was on the front wave of what is an increasingly vibrant local food movement. Wanda Otero, a microbiologist, decided to start her business in part to offer Puerto Ricans an alternative to expensive imported cheeses. She has since expanded into yogurt-making, and her products are now sold in supermarkets and found on the menus of the island’s finest restaurants. Travelers can visit the Vaca Negra facility for a tour, which includes the opportunity to make their own cheese.
Calle Progreso #4 Local #1, Rincón, 00677, Puerto Rico
Ocean State of Mind is a flourishing store right in the ever-growing center of Rincon, PR. The town center has attracted many new businesses with the installment of its popular “Art Walk” on Thursday nights. You can find artisans from all over the northwest corner of the island. One shop in particular features handmade silver jewelry using beachcombed finds from Puerto Rico. The shop features sarongs, handmade bikinis, ocean finds and all sorts of home decor and gifts. It’s the perfect stop to pick up a special piece for someone back home, or to splurge on yourself for something you will always remember from Puerto Rico!
204 Calle Fortaleza, San Juan, 00901, Puerto Rico
Travelers who love beautiful, locally made souvenirs, and who are concerned about their ethical sourcing, will want to stop by this shop in Old San Juan. Its inventory is composed entirely of goods that are made by Puerto Rican artisans and craftspeople; both the artists and objects sold are certified by the government. Look for the island’s traditional crafts, including vejigante masks and carved figurines called santos, which Catholic missionaries carried with them during the colonial era as ministerial storytelling tools. Puerto Rico is also known for its beautiful landscape paintings and woodblock prints.
La Perla, San Juan, Puerto Rico
In the heart of El Viejo San Juan, the Plaza Colón (Columbus Plaza) is so much more than a place honoring an important piece of San Juan’s history. Sure, snapping an Instagram photo in front of the bronze statue of Christopher Columbus, credited for the first discovery of the island, is definitely a “must-do.” Find a local and in your best Spanish accent say “Perdón, podría tomar una foto por favor?” Or play it safe and ask another tourist in English (they’re not hard to find!). Either way, stay and hang out. Explore the local artists’ tents (like this one, with rings and bracelets made from brightly colored ceramic beads and recycled aluminum, customized to fit). Pick out unique, inexpensive gifts for loved ones and, of course, something to remember the trip! And don’t ignore the ringing bell of the sorbet vendors selling “coco frio” for $1. Try a scoop of papaya y piña to help cool off in the heat of the Puerto Rican sun.
525 Av. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, San Juan, 00918, Puerto Rico
Visitors with an itch for shopping should plan a trip to Plaza Las Américas. Puerto Rico’s first indoor mall is the largest mall in the Caribbean, with some 300 shops, including many big American brands. The food court has more than 40 dining options.

PR-617, Morovis 00687, Puerto Rico
In 1862, the Panaderia La Patria (The Homeland Bakery) was established in the mountain town of Morovis. One of the oldest bakeries in the island, La Patria offers a variety of traditional Puerto Rican sweets like flan and quesitos (a pastry filled with cheese whipped with vanilla, eggs, and sugar). But we all know the bakery best for its “pan de la patita echa.” (“Echar la pata” is slang and can have various meanings, one of which is to start or throw yourself into something.) This is a kind of lard bread made only in Puerto Rico that looks like it has its legs crossed. Ask them to show your the century-old red oven in which they make their different breads and pastries.
Calle Vilella
The Heladería de Lares, a 45-year-old family business, sells about 50 unusual flavors of ice cream up in the mountains. Salvador Berreto, known to the locals as Yinyo, founded the shop to commemorate the Grito de Lares, a battle for freedom that had taken place exactly one century before. Yinyo started with corn, a flavor at the heart of the Puerto Rican diet and the current bestseller. Other flavors are cod, coquito (the Puerto Rican version of eggnog), and rice and beans. Fortunately, you can taste two flavors before deciding what to buy, and the ice cream is cheap, so you can stock up. Every weekend, people form what locals like to call lines, but are really boisterous blobs extending half a block down from the shop’s entrance. While eating, people skim through newspaper clips about when Denise Quiñones, a girl from Lares, won a Miss Universe pageant, or study photos of the 1945 Fuego de la Candelaria (a fire in Lares). After reading about the history behind Lares’s anthem and running their hands over the guiro (a musical instrument played by scraping its serrated surface), people often wander outside to the Plaza de la Revolucion. Here, on a typical Sunday, artisans sell paintings of the three magi (the Puerto Ricans’ second Santa) and of flamboyanes (the national trees with orange flowers). If you have doubts as to whether it’s worth it, just ask Bill Clinton and his daughter Chelsea. In 2008, Clinton forced $100 into the hands of Yinyo’s son for a mango ice cream.
Callen Miramar
The Red Door Boutique is a relatively new gift shop to Rincon. You can find all sorts of handmade crafts and upscale items for host gifts or trinkets for yourself. Nautical and island themed, this is a great place to find something out of the ordinary—not your typical souvenir. The shop stays open most days during the tourist season (Nov - Apr) and sporadically during the off-season, like many other places around town.
105 Calle de La Fortaleza, San Juan, PR 00901
I think the most appealing aspect of Old San Juan is the architecture and design of the city. Residential apartment buildings have been converted to designer boutiques or little B&Bs, and interior courtyards invite hungry guests to relax and unwind in the shade.... I’ve been to this area multiple times and still I manage to find a street I’ve never wandered down. Some are more popular than others, in particular Calle San Sebastian, which hosts eateries, bars, and shops, and Calle San Francisco. At the corner of this street is my particular favorite, Franky’s antiques. It’s in a four-story building, loaded with vintage goodies. There’s so much to see, one trip is not enough. If you want to shop, consider wandering all morning and into the early afternoon. You’ll be delighted by all the unique shops. Then, take a break at my favorite restaurant, Triana, for Spanish-style tapas and their famous sangria. It’s a must-stop place any time I’m in the old city. You don’t need a car to get around. Just park at one of the garages and explore by foot. There’s lots to see and do in Old San Juan.
Km4 Hm 7 Carretera 413 Ramal
You can find a number of small craft boutiques in Rincon, but none as eclectic as The Mango Beach Shop. Owned by a longtime resident of Rincon, one of the first non Puerto Ricans to call the west coast home, it’s a local legacy and favorite. Whenever I want to bring home a piece of local flare to friends and family, this is always my first stop. They have custom-made T-shirts, sarongs, jewelry, paintings, and more. Tell Milena that Chelsea sent you!
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