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These Baby Goat and Sheep Webcams Will Help You Through Quarantine

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Photo by Maksym Topchyi/Shutterstock

Self-isolating in the midst of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic can take its toll mentally, which is why we’ve never been so thankful for animal livestreams.

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Since the coronavirus first emerged in Wuhan, China, last December, the internet has been host to a steady stream of sobering announcements regarding countrywide lockdownstravel bans, and, of course, evolving news of the outbreak’s spread. Simultaneously, however, some incredibly uplifting content has also surfaced online.

Heartwarming videos that show residents in locked-down cities across Italy, France, and Spain applauding the efforts of healthcare workers from their windows have reinforced how community can help people prevail through tough times, and adorable footage of penguins taking “field trips” throughout the temporarily closed Chicago aquarium where they reside . . . well, those just lift our spirits and help pass the time while we stay inside. If feel-good footage is your M.O. right now, we have good news: You can also turn to baby goat and sheep webcams to put a smile on your face while you quarantine, thanks to these properties across the United States. 

Beekman 1802, an upstate New York farm that produces signature goat milk bath and beauty products, is broadcasting a free “baby goat cam” on its website that runs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The livestream transports viewers to the baby goat nursery within the barn, which is home to more than 100 goats (all of whom provide the milk for the natural products made at the Sharon Springs property). The Beekman 1802 Farm is currently in what it calls “baby goat season,” which means it’s “welcoming new members to the herd almost daily,” according to a post on the brand’s Instagram.

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Beekman 1802 (@beekman1802) on Mar 5, 2020 at 8:00pm PST

Beekman 1802’s cruelty-free goat milk products include hydrating facial cleansers, natural handsoaps, and nutrient-rich shampoos and conditioners. Its onsite mercantile also sells local gourmet food products such as raw honeys, jams, and syrups, and artisan-made handicrafts like ceramics and glassblown houseware. The brand is currently offering an online sale (25 percent off select items), so you can support the small business after you indulge yourself in baby-goat-watching delight. We recommend stocking up on the fresh soap packs first.

Buy it: $13.50, beekman1802.com

In California, the Napa Valley’s Shafer Vineyards is sharing an equally lovely-to-look-at springtime ritual with the virtual masses. Every year during this season, the 100 percent solar-powered winery invites hundreds of sheep to its vineyards to naturally “mow,” or eat, grass in the vine rows over the course of a few weeks. “We partner with these woolly weed eaters as part of our multi-faceted approach to sustainable, earth-friendly farming,” the Napa Valley winery explained in an Instagram post

This year, Shafer Winery placed cameras in its vineyards to record the sheep as they got to grazin’, which took place in early March. Shafer Vineyards plans to share the video montage on its YouTube channel by the end of this week (March 23), although exactly when the footage will be uploaded hasn’t been announced. We’ll update this article when the “sheep cam” becomes available online for free-viewing.

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Until then, you can catch a sneak peek of what to look forward to in the precious preview above, which, appropriately, is set to the sound of “Sheep May Safely Graze” by the 18th-century composer, Bach—or as the video’s starring sheep would say, Baaa-ch(Sorry, we couldn’t resist.)

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>>Next: Venice, Dolphins, and Northern Lights: Live Webcams for Virtual Travel