Lola (Akinmade) Åkerström’s What to do in gothenburg

From trendy up-and-coming cafes, hipster neighborhoods, and fusion restaurants to food tours, microbreweries, and the historic Haga district, Gothenburg is the best place to enjoy Sweden’s laid-back vibe and culinary traditions.

Örgrytevägen 5, 402 22 Göteborg, Sweden
The thrills of Sweden’s biggest theme park await you just a short walk or tram ride from the city center. From Balder, one of the world’s best wooden roller coasters, to the giant Ferris wheel affording unrivaled views across the region, Liseberg’s 40 rides offer excitement suited to every level of daring. If thrill-seeking isn’t your thing, Liseberg also has extensive gardens featuring waterfalls, artwork and a sculpture park, with several restaurants also on-site. Admission and ride tickets are sold separately, guaranteeing a good value day out regardless of how you choose to spend your time.
Arendal Skans
For a long time Swedes took great pride in the fact that they had two world-renowned car companies. Since the untimely demise of Saab in 2012, Volvo is now the pride of the nation. (Even though the company is now owned by a Chinese company, its headquarters remain in Gothenburg.) The Volvo Museum follows the company’s story since it was founded in 1927, showcasing the models that helped the company build its reputation for designing some of the safest cars on the road.
Fisktorget 4, 411 20 Göteborg, Sweden
Feskekörka means “the fish church” and is a fitting name for the indoor fish market, built in 1874, that houses all the glimmering delicacies of the sea. (The name is also an example of typical Gothenburg humor—playing with words and with lighthearted disrespect towards authority.) Inside you’ll find stalls packed with fresh fish and seafood, as well as stalls for lunch. Visit the restaurant Gabriel up on the balcony. The owner, Johan Malm, is a multiple-time oyster opening champion, so he can tell you everything you need to know about the briny bivalve.
Götaplatsen
Explore the extensive collection of Nordic art including the dark works of Edvard Munch, Bruno Liljefors’ wildlife paintings and the so-called “golden age” of Danish painters from the 19th century. International artists are represented with works by Monet, Picasso and Rembrandt, while the local history of Gothenburg’s Colorists is also explored. Check the gift shop for photography and architecture books. The small entrance fee also gives you access to the Röhsska Museum, Gothenburg City Museum, the Maritime Museum and the Museum of Natural History.
Pilgatan 20, 411 22 Göteborg, Sweden
Wander the cobbled streets to soak up the 19th-century atmosphere of Gothenburg’s oldest district. Formerly a working-class neighborhood, Haga’s wooden houses have been repurposed as independent shops and cafés with a cosmopolitan vibe. While the cafés are a little more expensive here than in other parts of the city, the setting makes a stop worthwhile. For unique souvenirs, check out the area’s many antique and thrift shops. Your trip to Haga is easy to combine with a visit to Skansen Kronan fortress (beware the steep steps!) or the Natural History Museum.
Hotels
Trädgårdsgatan 6, 411 08 Göteborg, Sweden
So where are we now? Could this be Vienna in central Europe in the early 20th century? Or maybe Paris in the same era? No, this is a small Gothenburg hotel, restaurant, and bar that fulfills the dreams of owner Thomas Peterson. Coming from a well-renowned family in the restaurant business, Peterson wanted to create his personal vision of an extraordinary restaurant and hotel that paid homage to childhood memories of his grandfather hosting celebrities and artists at home and in his restaurant. Try the afternoon tea, or have a drink on the roof terrace. No matter what you eat or drink, the ambiance is a large part of the experience.
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