Flamenco: 9 Places to See the Traditional Spanish Dance

Flamenco is a traditional Spanish dance, steeped in history and tradition. Whirling dresses and stamping feet make this Andalusian tradition a must-see, while exploring Spain.

Highlights
Calle Manuel Rojas Marcos, 3, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Cristina Hoyos, probably the most famous flamenco dancer of all time (her image from the 1960s is often used to represent the iconic flamenco dancer, with a slicked-back raven-black chignon and a fiercely passionate demeanor), founded this museum full of interactive exhibits. It also features a popular nightly flamenco performance. Even if you can’t make the live performance, video displays tell the story of the history and various styles of this noisy, sensual and compelling art form.
Paseo de Cristóbal Colón, 11, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
Colour, music and dancing are an integral part of life in Andalusia, Spain. For a taste of the region’s Flamenco, head to El Patio Sevillano in Seville (Sevilla). A variety of dancers, in colourful traditional costumes, will whirl and stomp across the stage, while a band plays authentic Flamenco music. Catch an early show and then hit the town for tapas and drinks at a nearby Taverna.
Calle Céspedes, 21, A, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
La Carboneria is a special place. Unlike the tourist spots for flamenco, this feels alive. There is a buzz of energy, a sense of place as friends call out to each other before the show starts, the stone floored room smells of woodsmoke,and the performers have an authentic intensity that makes the evening soar. The performance doesn’t begin until 10:30, and your €5,00 ticket price gets you a €5,00 drink. The drink is not memorable, I dare you to take your eyes off the stage.
Carrera del Darro, 13, 18010 Granada, Spain
There are many places to view Flamenco in Granada. There are large shows in Sacramonte that cost 25-35 Euros and have a flare for showing the dramatics and storytelling of the dance, and there are shows that have no dance and play in dark underground pubs. There is every range of Flamenco played and performed. Le Chien Andalou is easy to find, unlike some places father into the Albycin, it is cheap at 7 euros, and the food and drinks are neither life changing nor horrible. The music changes every night, I have been a few handfuls of times and have witnessed a sampling from slightly better than mediocre to quite incredible performances. It is often wise to stop by and make a reservation as the space is limited in this little wine cellar room full of short stools and low tables. I recommend this place for those wanting to experience Flamenco to either be intrigued by it, to fall in love with its depth and soul, or to walk away at least saving 20 euros while discovering it was not to your taste. For those with a bit more adventure to explore the streets of the upper Albaycin, and a with a bit more of a budget for delicious food (or if Le Chien Andalou has left you wanting to experience more flamenco) then I recommended: Restaurante, Flamenco Jardines de Zoraya(from a past highlight, and one of my favorite spots for Flamenco, Food, and the best Sangria!)
C. Panaderos, 32, 18010 Granada, Spain
There are plenty of flamenco places in Granada, from the 35 euro tourist cave to the 6 euro wine cellar. My love for flamenco has drawn me to each one. I think the best deal especially if you are only in Granada for a week or a weekend is to splurge and go out for a great meal, the best sangria I’ve tasted in Spain, and some very talented and passionate flamenco. For almost the same price as the tourist filled sacramonte flamenco caves you can have a three-course delicious meal and see top quality flamenco at “Restaurante Jardines de Zoraya, tablao Flamenco.” Located in the Albaycin this restaurant has flamenco shows twice a night and a third matinee show on Saturday and Sunday. Come early so you give yourself time to find it in the hilly small alleys of the Albaycin and also to get a seat and order before the show starts.
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