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Curaçao Lifts Quarantine Requirements for Travelers From These Three States

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Curaçao’s capital city, Willemstad, is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

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Curaçao’s capital city, Willemstad, is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Travelers from New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut no longer have to quarantine for 14 days, but they’ll have to wait until November for commercial flights to relaunch to the Caribbean island.

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This is a developing story. For the latest information on traveling during the coronavirus outbreak, visit the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization.

Curaçao dropped its 14-day quarantine requirements for leisure travelers from countries deemed to be low-risk and medium-risk for COVID-19 transmission back in July. Now the small island located about 40 miles off the north coast of Venezuela has also removed quarantine requirements for travelers from three U.S. states—New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut—as of October 7, 2020.

However, that doesn’t mean travelers from the tri-state region can hop on a plane right now. While borders are reopened to people with a state-issued ID as proof of residency and negative COVID-19 PCR test results from within 72 hours prior to departure, there are no commercial flights heading to Curaçao from the United States until November 7, 2020.

As Curaçao opens to U.S. travelers, be sure to carefully read what the country is requiring of international visitors and ask yourself the following questions before you book anything:

  • Do I have travel insurance that will cover me if I cancel or get sick while on vacation?
  • Will my home state require me to quarantine or get tested when I get back from my trip? 
  • If the travel rules change right before I travel, does my airline and my hotel have a flexible cancellation policy?

As of October 15, there have been 645 confirmed COVID-19 cases and one resulting death in Curaçao, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Here’s what we know about traveling to Curaçao right now.

What are the test and health screening requirements to enter Curaçao?

Since July 2020, travelers from neighboring low-risk Caribbean countries have been able to enter Curaçao as long as they complete a digital immigration card online before departure and fill out a Passenger Locator Card (PLC) at dicardcuracao.com within 48 hours before departure and carry a printed document of proof. 

A maximum of 10,000 travelers from medium-risk countries have also been able to visit Curaçao since July as long as they complete the two steps mentioned above, as well as have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to departure. Medium-risk countries include Austria, Canada, China, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Finland, France, Greece, Guyana, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, Turks and Caicos, Uruguay, and the United Kingdom.

As of October 7, the states of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut have also been added to the medium-risk travel list. In addition to filling out a digital immigration card and a Passenger Locator Card at dicardcuracao.com and having negative COVID test results, travelers from these states must present a state-issued ID as proof of residency.

Travelers from all other states and countries not listed above must apply for a permit to enter Curaçao and complete a mandatory 14-day quarantine at their own expense in order to enter.

How to get to Curaçao?

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Even though Curaçao’s borders are now open to American travelers from the tri-state region without quarantine, unless you have access to a private jet or yacht it will be difficult to get there before November from North America. Commercial airlift doesn’t return until November 7, 2020, when United starts weekly nonstop Saturday service from Newark International Airport. Starting December 9, JetBlue will fly nonstop from JFK on Wednesdays and Saturdays and anticipates increasing the frequency to four flights a week for the holiday season. Nonstop service from Toronto on Air Canada will resume November 14, 2020.

What happens if I test positive for COVID-19 in Curaçao?

All travelers must also be adequately insured for medical care and any additional costs, since all visitors who are required to quarantine and receive medical attention must do so at their own expense. Travelers who show symptoms related to COVID-19 must immediately contact the health authority by calling 9345. If you test positive for COVID-19 during your stay in Curaçao, you will need to quarantine immediately. 

What is open in Curaçao now?

Unlike many other Caribbean islands that have reopened their borders but are restricting tourists to their resorts during their stay, travelers are allowed to rent cars in Curaçao and move around the island freely during their visit. 

The island’s only five-star hotel, Baoase Luxury Resort, is currently open for individual stays as well as full resort buy-outs. While the resort isn’t requiring guests to wear face masks, it has implemented new social-distancing and disinfection protocols at the property. A new policy allows for cancellations up to seven days prior to arrival to be fully refunded. Guests are also encouraged to move reservations to future dates.

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The Renaissance Curaçao Resort is also currently open and recently completed a major renovation in January. Following local health and safety protocols, face masks are required in all indoor public spaces at the hotel. As part of Marriott International, the hotel is following the health and safety requirements of the brand’s “Commitment to Clean” standards. Guests may cancel their reservation for no charge up to one day before arrival. 

For more information, visit curacao.com

>> Next: The Caribbean Islands Reopening for Tourism This Year

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