Woodstock
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Experience the rebirth of Cape Town's oldest and most diverse neighborhood
Quick history lesson: The area was inhabited by Khoikhoi until the arrival of Dutch in the 1600s.With the massive land reclamation of Table Bay in the 1950s to create the Cape Town foreshore, Woodstock beach was lost, and combined with the increasingly industrial nature of the suburb, Woodstock ceased to be a seaside resort. Woodstock however managed to remain integrated during Apartheid and survived being declared a ‘whites only’ area with the forced removals and demolition of houses as happened in nearby District Six. As a ‘grey’ area, many coloured and black people started to move into Woodstock during the 1970s and 1980s, laying the foundation for the urban renewal which was to start in the late 1990s. The face of Woodstock has changed dramatically over the last decade. Trendy restaurants, innovative media and other shops have sprung up in converted and revamped warehouses, abandoned buildings and even a disused castle brewery. Still a melting pot of flavors; edgy, rough, poor yet bursting with amazing street art and niche bookshops and boutiques. If you like your neighborhoods real, creative, interesting and filled with unique places to shop and hang out, Woodstock is the place for you.
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