Odette en Ville
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Odette en Ville
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Odette en Ville
Odette en Ville
A 1920s townhouse in Brussels’ well-heeled Châtelain neighborhood, the intimate, Fellini-inspired Odette en Ville might as well be your fashionable Belgian friends’ pied-à-terre in the European capital. Its older sibling, Chez Odette, a landmark restaurant and inn, is hidden away in the tiny village of Williers, on the French-Belgian border, and when the Brussels iteration opened, it dressed up with all the panache of a newer arrival: a little bit flashier, a little bit sleeker, a little bit more urbane. Its marble bathrooms, dark walls, and chrome accents all feel very grown-up, but roll-top tubs, fireplaces, and vintage decor reveal those homey country roots, as does the fresh, unpretentious cuisine, including the homemade jam at breakfast. With just eight rooms, the hotel feels intimate and private, an atmosphere only enhanced by the private library, a cozy lounge (notably, adjacent to the bar) with overstuffed leather Chesterfields, vintage chess sets, shelves of art books, and a working fireplace. 
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Neighborhood Vibe
The fashionable Châtelain area, south of Brussels’ city center, in Ixelles, may not be in the heart of the tourist or business action, but there’s plenty to do and see among its scenic streets for those who want to explore the city like a local. Just down the block, the Place du Châtelain transforms on Wednesdays into one of the city’s most iconic markets, where vendors sell everything from antiques to clothing to food. A block in the other direction is the Avenue Louise, Brussels’ main designer shopping drag; the streets around it are filled with independent boutiques and charming cafés and restaurants. While in the neighborhood, pay a visit to the Victor Horta Museum, once the home of the famous art nouveau architect, and keep an eye out for his other buildings as you explore the city.
Need to Know
Rooms: Eight rooms. From $305.
Check-in: 3 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options: Sultry and sophisticated, Odette’s acclaimed restaurant lets its high-quality local ingredients do the talking, leaving diners to build their own dishes by serving most dressings and sauces alongside perfectly cooked classics like steak and lobster linguini. An extensive breakfast buffet, with homemade jams and breads, is served daily, but not included in most rates. Adjacent to the restaurant, the equally atmospheric bar—its walls lined with black-and-white photographs, its black lacquered floors topped with low chairs and mirrored tables—serves a full menu of wines and spirits; take your drink into the adjacent library for a more private atmosphere. A simple room service menu is available around the clock, and, in the warmer months, terrace dining is available.
Spa and gym details: The hotel has neither a gym nor a spa, but does have an arrangement with a nearby spa for discounted treatments.
Insider Tips
Who's it best for:Couples on romantic weekends, and independent travelers with retro film-star style.
Our favorite rooms:Category 3 rooms have a private terrace and soaking tub, while the Category 1 rooms are the largest and have a gas fireplace, as well as a tub.
Tasty highlight: Don’t miss the house French (or, rather, Belgian) fries, which just might be the best you’ll ever have.
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