Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
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Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi
You’d never know that this pueblo-luxe hotel was once the town penitentiary. It’s a credit to Rosewood Hotels & Resorts that the hotel group chose to renovate the existing structure rather than level it and start from scratch. And, if the rooms are on the smaller side, no one seems to mind, especially after the just-completed renovation by Jim Rimelspach, who originally designed the property when it opened nearly 25 years ago. Named after the lost tribe of the Anasazi, ancestors of the Pueblo, the hotel tastefully pays tribute to the Southwest. Adobe walls, kiva-style fireplaces, handwoven carpets, and throw pillows made from Pendleton blankets pair seamlessly with Italian linens by Rivolta Carmignani and toiletries by New York’s C.O. Bigelow Apothecaries. There’s also plenty of Native American art, including Arlo Namingha’s bronze sculpture Hano Mana and Ken Rosenthal’s silver gelatin print Seen and Not Seen, throughout the three-story hotel. The result: A vibe that is modern and sophisticated while still maintaining a sense of place.
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Neighborhood Vibe
Across the street from the Palace of Governors and less than a block from the Santa Fe Plaza, the Inn affords easy access to downtown’s boutiques and museums, including the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. Favorite restaurants include Café Pasqual for local, organic, Southwest-meets-California fare, and, if you like chocolate, the Kakawa Chocolate House is a must. The hotel is also a short drive from Canyon Road, home to the majority of Santa Fe’s top art galleries.
Need to Know
Rooms: 58 rooms and one suite. From $219.
Check-in: 4 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options: Chef Juan Bochenski hails from Argentina and melds his native flavors with those of the Southwest at the rustic-chic Anasazi Restaurant & Bar. The more casual outdoor Patio is ideal for tacos and margaritas with a side of people watching, and, for special occasions, there’s the 12-seat Wine Cellar.
Spa and gym details: There isn’t a fitness center or spa, but in-room treatments can be arranged.
Insider Tips
Who's it for: Celebs and A-listers, eco- and socially-conscious travelers, art aficionados and culture fiends.
Our favorite rooms: All superior and deluxe king rooms have balconies with chaise lounges, but room 202 is the only one with views of the Plaza.
Catch up on your reading: Settle into one of the leather chairs with a good book—or borrow one from the shelves and read up on New Mexico’s history—in the hotel’s inviting library.
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