Read Bruce Aidells’ story on muffuletta, and see the recipe.

Cochon Butcher
Located in the Arts District (the former Warehouse District), Cochon Butcher adjoins the German-Cajun Cochon restaurant. Chef Stephen Stryjewski’s house-cured meats are the main attraction. In addition to an artisanal muffuletta, sandwiches include pork belly with mint and cucumber, and a buckboard bacon melt with collard greens. 930 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 588-7675, cochonbutcher.com

Central Grocery
The line forms early outside the iconic Italian-American store that invented the muffuletta and remains its best-known purveyor. Descendants of the Sicilian founder still run the operation and can send you home with a jar of the famous olive dressing, or a copy of Marie Lupo Tusa’s Sicilian-French-Creole cookbook Marie’s Melting Pot. If you have a taste for something completely different to accompany your sandwich, try the Zapp’s spicy Cajun “Crawtato” chips. 923 Decatur St., (504) 523-1620

Napoleon House
Former New Orleans mayor Nicholas Girod was the first resident of this 200-year-old landmark (shown at top). In 1821 he issued Napoleon an invitation to stay here, allegedly as part of a plot to rescue the French emperor from exile. The three-story building has been known as the Napoleon House ever since. Po’ boy sandwiches, jambalaya, seafood gumbo, and red beans and rice with smoked sausage join the jumbo muffuletta on the classic café menu. 500 Chartres St., (504) 522- 4152, napoleonhouse.com

Photo by Cedric Angeles. This appeared in the May/June 2012 issue.