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Recent Travel Highlights

Coquine

Portland
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Coquine, Portland, Oregon
Coquine
Coquine is an unassuming little “neighborhood restaurant” in the shadow of Mt. Tabor that offers one of the city’s best dining experiences. Chef Katy Millard cooks what tickles her fancy, usually something seasonal, vaguely continental, definitely Northwestern, and always interesting. The whole chicken to share is a constant on the menu as a crowd favorite, however. Unlike many fine-dining establishments, you can stop in for breakfast or lunch too. Try the chocolate chip cookies, which are so popular that you used to have to call ahead and order them in advance if you wanted them at dinner. Ksandek Podbielski, Millard’s husband, oversees the regionally focused yet still surprising wine list.
Coquine
1 experience

Löyly

Portland
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Löyly, Portland, Oregon
Löyly
Now with two locations (in NE and SE), Löyly is a mecca for serious steamers in need of sauna time. Done up with a white walls and blonde wood aesthetic that you’d expect from a vaguely Scandinavian establishment—"löyly" is the Finnish word for the steam rising from water poured on stones in the sauna—these communal schvitzeries are the place to soak away your worries. Loyly hosts women-only sauna nights at both locations once a week, as well as offering massages and skincare services every day of the week. The wine and beer on offer helps ease sauna newbies nervous about the experience.
Löyly
1 experience

Mt. Tabor Park

Portland
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Mt. Tabor Park, Portland, Oregon
Mt. Tabor Park
A dormant volcano right inside the city limits is one of Portland’s many natural treasures. The park as residents know it today was designed in 1936 by Emanuel Tillman Mische who, for most of his career, worked for the Olmsted Brothers, the leading landscape architects of the period. Today, its winding paths are chockablock with bicyclists testing their mettle and hikers exploring the park’s many trails and its three reservoirs in search of fresh air and views of the surrounding valley. There are three different main routes to explore by foot, and it’s also possible to drive to the summit of Mt. Tambor and take a quick amble through the firs and pines after you find a parking spot.
Mt. Tabor Park
1 experience

Sandy River Delta Park

Troutdale
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Sandy River Delta Park, Troutdale, Oregon
Sandy River Delta Park
In the Sandy River Delta park, Portland has its own work by well-known artist and architect Maya Lin. Located just outside of town, it’s a mile-and-a-half walk to the site itself, a wooden structure open to the elements called the “Bird Blind.” Inscribed vertically along the blind’s slats are the species Lewis and Clark spotted as they hacked a trail west—and whether or not these species are still alive today. It’s a sobering reminder of the effect humans have on the environment, all while getting a view of the river and the mountains on the Washington side of the river.
Sandy River Delta Park
1 experience

Park Avenue Fine Wines

Portland
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Park Avenue Fine Wines, Portland, Oregon
Park Avenue Fine Wines
All those Willamette Valley Pinot Noirs you’ve heard about? This is the wine shop in Portland where you’ll find many of them. Fresh off a move in 2016 to a space that used to be a brasserie, Park Avenue Wines 8,500 square feet of space includes a wine bar called Bardot, storage for your wine (wine lockers!), and plenty of space for evening tasting events. Northwest wine aficionados will want to opt for one of their wine clubs, one of which focuses solely on wines from the region. As a place to start an education about the wines from the Willamette Valley and environs, it’s hard to beat.
Park Avenue Fine Wines
1 experience

Portland Art Museum

Portland
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Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon
Portland Art Museum
The Portland Art Museum has been a fixture of the Rose City for longer than you’d expect. The oldest art museum on the West Coast, the museum opened in 1892. The current location, on the South Park Blocks, opened in 1932, with a design by Pietro Belluschi. Today, the permanent collection includes 42,000 objects along with a rotating selection of exhibits. In previous years, the museum hosted works by Rodin, Andy Warhol, and what is thought to be the largest cat painting in the world. The 2.5 block campus also includes the Northwest Film Center.
Portland Art Museum
1 experience

Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.

Portland
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Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co., Portland, Oregon
Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.
Anyone taking diligent notes on Portland decor is sure to notice some similarities in design from location to location, beyond a love for taxidermy. Much of that Rose City decorating style emanates from Schoolhouse Electric. Located in a 115-year-old red brick warehouse and factory building in an industrial part of Portland’s West Side, Schoolhouse Electric sells everything from perfect reproductions of 1960s-era IBM clocks to more vintage sconces and analog clocks than you can shake a stick at. The store's Ristretto Roasters coffee bar provides a caffeine boost when your energy for curated doorknobs reaches its limit.
Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.
1 experience

Tilikum Crossing

Portland
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Tilikum Crossing, Portland, Oregon
Tilikum Crossing
Portland’s newest bridge, Tilikum Crossing is a striking addition to Portland’s skyline. Adding an additional bridge crossing the Willamette to a city already known as Bridgetown was no small feat. Construction on the car-free (that’s right, it’s open to pedestrians, bikers, and the MAX light rail only) was finished in 2015. Linking the South Waterfront (home to OHSU and the massive ZIdell Yards project) to the Central Eastside, the 1,720-foot suspension bridge is lit by 178 LED modules each night. The bridge, named after the Chinook word for “people,” even has osprey nesting poles at both ends and a conductor that amplifies noises from the river, serving as an aural art installation.
Tilikum Crossing
1 experience

Council Crest Park

Portland
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Council Crest Park, Portland, Oregon
Council Crest Park
It’s not exactly Portland’s highest point, but it’s up there at 1,073 feet. Irrespective of how it measures up, Council Crest Park provides a view of five surrounding mountains on a clear day: Rainier, Adams, Jefferson, Hood and Saint Helens, with helpful indicators showing which mountain is which, for those not as well-versed in freestyle mountain identification as lifelong Portlanders are. Bolder folks may opt to hike to the summit along the trails here, though driving up the hill past suffering road bicyclists is an easier option year-round. The water tower that’s now part of the park here was once a feature of the Council Crest Amusement Park, torn down in 1941.
Council Crest Park
1 experience

Serra Dispensary Downtown

Portland
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Serra Dispensary Downtown, Portland, Oregon
Serra Dispensary Downtown
This is the best way to explore Portland’s budding dispensary scene. At Serra Modern Druggist’s flagship downtown location, you’ll get a one-on-one walkthrough of edibles, flower, and every other form of cannabis product imaginable. The space screams high-end retail: glass, wood, white walls, succulents and plenty of branded items. Entry is limited so that customers receive one-on-one service when they enter the store. Snag a set of “feel all the feelings” matches and prepare for a learning session with a knowledgeable budtender. The overall effect is calming, as well as a fascinating window into what legalized cannabis stores will look like as they spread to other parts of the United States.
Serra Dispensary Downtown
1 experience

Purringtons Cat Lounge

Portland
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Purringtons Cat Lounge, Portland, Oregon
Purringtons Cat Lounge
Possibly the city’s most echt Portland venue. Instagrammable, adoptable cats? Check. Meow-mosas, meow-vie nights and cat yoga? Of course. Purringtons provides a venue for meeting cats looking for a home, as well as a place for folks to chill out with some furry friends. Staff are clear about ground rules during the visits, which start in 30-minute increments. If you fall in love, you are welcome to join the roster of adopters sheltering “Purrington’s Alumni.” Bring your own allergy medication if that’s an issue, but for a respite from the trials and tribulations of our modern world, it doesn’t get much better than stopping in for some time with a lap cat.
Purringtons Cat Lounge
1 experience

Powell's City of Books

Portland
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Powell's City of Books, Portland, Oregon
Powell's City of Books
An iconic name in Portland retail—as well as among readers who have never been to the city—Powell’s has multiple locations on both sides of the Willamette. The downtown store remains the one best suited for visitors to explore with miles of used reads, a tightly curated selection of books from the knowledgeable staff, and every Portland-themed book you could hope to find under one roof. A renovation in 2014 opened up the space and made it feel less like a warehouse of dusty stacks, an improvement that bodes well for the future of the business. The author appearances, even those at the satellite branches, are often some of Portland’s best events for interesting discussions.
Powell's City of Books
1 experience

Solabee Flowers & Botanicals

Portland
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Solabee Flowers & Botanicals, Portland, Oregon
Solabee Flowers & Botanicals
Looking to take home a piece of Portland? Meet your new best fronds who are here to help. Portland’s best smeller, Solabee Flowers and Botanicals is your source for cute little succulents, staghorn ferns, stately palms and just about anything else you could imagine from the world of houseplants, ceramics and pottery, crystals, and palo santo, the popular South American incense sticks. All those plants make for a sunny bi-level shop that’s an olfactory heaven. The helpful staff of plant experts are happy to consult with you and troubleshoot any issues you may have with your cacti. This very Portland store even boasts a corgi mascot who is often featured on Solabee’s Instagram feed.
Solabee Flowers & Botanicals
1 experience

Wildfang

Portland
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Wildfang, Portland, Oregon
Wildfang
On the corner of a rather scrofulous downtown block (across the street from the Ace Hotel’s event space) Wildfang is a self-described “home for badass women.” Whether it’s street style with a feminist message—even in Portland, it’s not every day that one finds a “Slay the Patriarchy” baseball cap—or high-fashion clothing that works on all sorts of body types, Wildfang packs it into their store. For hangers-on who aren’t as interested in shopping or fashion, the bar inside the store provides liquid relief, including beers designed in collaboration with 10 Barrel that were created by women brewmasters.
Wildfang
1 experience

Dame

Eat
Dame
Dame
The multiple meanings of the name—both as a title for a respected lady and an old-school moniker for a let’s-have-fun-type-gal—are a window into the experience of eating at Dame. Opened on what is now a vibrant section of Killingsworth Street by Dana Frank and Jane Smith—though only Smith now remains—the painstakingly crafted food turned out by the kitchen is seasonal, surprising, and pairs well with a selection from one of Portland’s best wine menus. The whimsical interior, done with subway tile, hardwood floor, and dark blue walls, belies the seriousness of their craft, selecting natural wines to pair with sometimes overlooked ingredients like chicken hearts, sardines, and sweetbreads.
Dame
1 experience

Hat Yai

Portland
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Hat Yai, Portland, Oregon
Hat Yai
Portland’s only southern Thai fried chicken restaurant also happens to be Portland’s best fried chicken restaurant, full stop. It helps to have one of Portland’s ambassadors of Thai cuisine, Earl Ninsom—of impossible-to-reserve Langbaan and takeout-staple PaaDee—behind the counter-service concept in the cheery, narrow space where diners rub elbows with the cooks. The unique style of preparing the birds, which are rubbed with cumin, white pepper, coriander, and fresh garlic before they’re breaded with rice flour, fried, and served with fresh shallots, results in a crispy, spicy, just-light-enough flavor profile. Pair with the housemade curry and roti, mixing and matching and dipping as you go, for maximum enjoyment.
Hat Yai
1 experience

Quaintrelle

Portland
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Quaintrelle, Portland, Oregon
Quaintrelle
One of the leaders of Portland’s vegetable-forward movement in the restaurant scene (along with Tusk), Quaintrelle is quietly one of the city’s best fine-dining choices. All this on a strip of Mississippi Street better known for bar crawls and brunch lines than for seasonal cuisine and killer cocktails. The eclectic American menu rotates based on what’s available and in season. Almost all of the food is local, which includes everything from tempura Meyer lemons to a carrot and raisin salad. Meals at Quaintrelle can easily double as a primer for learning what can be grown in Oregon, including wouldn’t-guess-this-is-local ingredients like quinoa and wasabi.
Quaintrelle
1 experience

Rose VL Deli

Portland
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Rose VL Deli, Portland, Oregon
Rose VL Deli
From an unassuming strip mall on Portland’s far east side, Rose VL Deli dishes out two types of pho daily (and the smaller original location, Ha VL, also serves banh mi sandwiches). The rich, complex aromatic broth is transcendent whether it’s made for a simple bowl of bun bo hue or a flavor-palooza like the Vietnamese Turmeric Noodles. Fans include local Asian food ambassador Andy Ricker, of Pok Pok, and just about any other chef in town who fancies themselves a connoisseur of Vietnamese cuisine. Slurp loudly, enjoy the soap operas playing on the TV, and plan on a nap afterwards.
Rose VL Deli
1 experience

Blue Star Donuts

Portland
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Blue Star Donuts, Portland, Oregon
Blue Star Donuts
Donuts are to Portland as David Lynch is to coffee, both essential fuel and calling card. While there are many pretenders to the title of the city's best doughnuts—like Voodoo Donuts, which certainly sells Portland’s most Instagrammable food products—Blue Star, from ubiquitous local restaurateur Micah Camden, is the most consistent. Flavors range from powdered sugar to maple bacon to passionfruit cacao nib, sold fresh daily until no more remain. The downtown location gets crowded early on weekends, so plan ahead. In a pinch, grab them at Blue Star’s airport location, which makes asking a friend to pick you up at the airport a sweet request, indeed.
Blue Star Donuts
1 experience

Pine Street Market

Portland
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Pine Street Market, Portland, Oregon
Pine Street Market
Wish that your one-stop shopping and dining location included high-concept ice cream, ramen, and New York-style pizza? Look no further than Pine Street Market. Portland’s first modern food hall, the renovated 1886 Carriage & Baggage Building is home to locations from some of Portland’s best-loved restaurateurs. Whiz Bang Bar (featuring the nation’s only location high-concept soft serve from the folks at Salt and Straw), Bless Your Heart Burger (done Carolina-style, from Toro Bravo’s John Gorham) and OP Wurst (from local wurst-meisters Olympia Provisions) round out the slate of food stands. The 10,000-square-foot space is listed on the National Register of Historic places and was the home of Old Spaghetti Factory until 1981.
Pine Street Market
1 experience

Tusk

Portland
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Tusk, Portland, Oregon
Tusk
Chef Joshua McFadden is Portland’s “vegetable whisperer." That’s no small accolade in a town where vegans roam free and farm-to-table is table stakes for most high-end restaurants. At Tusk, his Middle Eastern-inflected restaurant on Burnside, McFadden turns out small plates. Each dish is near reverent of the ingredients, with “vegetables, fruits, and grains” literally at the center of the printed menus. Brunch at Tusk is a more eclectic affair, and also one of Portland’s hottest weekend seats. The bright space even makes waiting to eat a pleasant experience, one well worth the time it takes for the chance to taste the creations from one of Portland’s premier chefs.
Tusk
1 experience

Travaasa Hana, Maui

Hana
EatStayDo
Travaasa Hana, Maui, Hana, Hawaii
Travaasa Hana, Maui
An antidote to hectic modern life, a stay at Travassa Hana, on Maui’s remote eastern coast, feels like a step back in time. There are no televisions, radios, clocks, or air-conditioning (ceiling fans and panoramic sliding doors capture ocean breezes) in nearly all of the 70 cottages and suites, but you won’t miss them. Your days will be spent soaking up Hawaiian culture, whether that means fishing with throw nets, making traditional ti leaf leis, or enjoying an open-air ukulele lesson. Of course, no visit to these parts is complete without a journey along the legendary Road to Hana, which lies to the north and west and promises primordial views of waterfalls, gardens, and secluded swimming holes. Upon your return to the resort, don’t miss the fresh-caught specialties at Preserve Kitchen and Bar, overlooking Hana Bay.
Travaasa Hana, Maui
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Fairmont Kea Lani, Maui

Kihei
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Fairmont Kea Lani, Maui, Kihei, Hawaii
Fairmont Kea Lani, Maui
Of all the accommodations in Maui’s tony Wailea resort community, the Fairmont Kea Lani may be the most family-friendly of the bunch. The 22-acre waterfront property’s 450 guest rooms are some of the biggest on the island—the smallest start at a generous 860 square feet—and feature soaking tubs, sleeper sofas, and balconies that provide plenty of room for horseplay. Three indoor and three outdoor pools follow suit for times when kids club activities (among them volcano building, hula lessons, and tide pool excursions) aren’t on the agenda. But grownups will find plenty to love as well, from outrigger canoe journeys and tee times at three championship golf courses nearby to locally sourced spa treatments and the 2,000-bottle wine cellar at onsite seafood restaurant Nick’s Fishmarket Maui.
Fairmont Kea Lani, Maui
1 experience, added to 1 List

Gramercy Tavern

New York
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Gramercy Tavern, New York, New York
Gramercy Tavern
Now 23 years old, Gramercy Tavern in the Flatiron District can fairly be described as a New York institution. When the restaurant opened, Tom Colicchio, who has gone on to fame as much as a television chef as one who cooks in his kitchens, presided over the restaurant. In 2006, he passed the reins to Michael Anthony. Gramercy Tavern is actually two restaurants in one. The Tavern, in the front, is a lively, buzzy space where the menu is a la carte. The more formal Dining Room, in the rear of the restaurant, has an a la carte menu, as well as prix fixe and tasting ones, at lunch, though only set ones at dinner, when a three-course menu is $129 and tasting one is $179. The vegetable tasting menu at dinner, for $159, is perhaps among the most gourmet vegetarian meals anyone will ever experience. (All prices include gratuities.) The dishes in both spaces could be described as American comfort food elevated with some gourmet touches. You can expect seasonal produce to be emphasized in dishes like the duck meatloaf and the cobblers and pies—the restaurant is known for its delicious desserts.
Gramercy Tavern
1 experience

Le Bernardin

New York
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Le Bernardin, New York, New York
Le Bernardin
Le Bernardin, on 51st between 6th and 7th, is one of the handful of New York restaurants that is regularly awarded four stars by the New York Times (it is also one of six restaurants in the city with three Michelin stars). Chef Eric Ripert's specialty is fish, and the menu is divided into three categories: "almost raw," "barely touched," and "lightly cooked." If you like your tuna cooked medium, this isn't the right place for you. Ripert often finds his inspiration in Japanese cooking, with sashimi and light broths, along with some Latin American influences, in his ceviches and some other dishes. The fish is always allowed to take center stage and typically any sauce or broth is merely intended to accent its flavors. The dining room has an understated, contemporary style with light-wood walls and high ceilings. The three-course prix fixe at lunch is $88; the four-course one at dinner is $157. Unlike some celebrated chefs, Ripert has chosen not to build a restaurant empire, increasing the odds that on any visit he will be at Le Bernardin, presiding over its kitchen and dining room.
Le Bernardin
1 experience

Eleven Madison Park

New York
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Eleven Madison Park, New York, New York
Eleven Madison Park
In April 2017, the World's 50 Best Restaurants List (produced by the British magazine Restaurant), bestowed the title of the best restaurant anywhere on Eleven Madison Park. It marked the first time in 13 years that an American restaurant had secured the top spot. (The previous U.S. winner was Thomas Keller's French Laundry, in 2003 and 2004.) It's not the restaurant's only laurel: It has also received three stars from Michelin and four from the New York Times. If you want to judge for yourself, be prepared to spend $295 for an 8- to 10-course tasting menu (or $155 for the smaller 5-course bar menu). Both prices include tips, but not beverages. Executive Chef Daniel Humm's menu could be called haute American—local ingredients are highlighted in dishes with preparations that border on, but don't cross over, into the fussy. The dining room itself compliments the meal. Right after the restaurant was named the world's best, it closed for a four-month renovation and its new light- and art-filled interior pairs perfectly with Humm's dishes.
Eleven Madison Park
1 experience

Brooklyn Museum

New York
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Brooklyn Museum, New York, New York
Brooklyn Museum
When plans for the Brooklyn Museum's building on Eastern Parkway were conceived in 1890 the borough was still its own city—it wasn't until 1898 that the five boroughs would be united into the New York City we know today. Brooklyn's leading figures were determined that the city should have its own great public institutions, and it was in the late 19th century that not only the museum, but also the Brooklyn Botanic Garden was planned and the Brooklyn Academy of Music expanded. By the time the museum, designed by McKim, Mead and White, opened, however, the city had changed and much of Brooklyn's cultural life would long sit in the shadow of Manhattan. Still, the Brooklyn Museum remains to this day a grand institution with some important collections, most notably of Egyptian art, American decorative art, and, an unusual niche, the Sackler Center for Feminist Art with its most important work being Judy Chicago's Dinner Party (1979). The museum sits next to Brooklyn's Botanic Gardens and Prospect Park, two other landmarks of the borough that you'll want to explore if the weather cooperates when you head out to Grand Army Plaza.
Brooklyn Museum
1 experience, added to 1 List
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