Where are you going?
Or, let us surprise youSpin the Globe ®

Wishlist

List View
Map View
Dan Bailey′s Wishlist
Save Place
Calz. de Amador, Panamá, Panama
Palm-lined Amador Causeway is a breezy locale for renting and riding bicycles. Sights along the way include the Museum of Biodiversity designed by Frank Gehry, boats on the bay, a marina, and, across the canal, the Bridge of the Americas...
Save Place
Punta Culebra, Panamá, Panama
You are (almost) guaranteed the sight many an iguana and at least one sloth while on a visit to Punta Culebra. This small treasure is a Smithsonian museum outpost on Amador Causeway. The grounds are made of a forest and beach, as well as...
Save Place
Panama Canal, Panama
Paddling through the Panama Canal? Yes, a passion born from an annual race called the Regata de Cayucos: Ocean to Ocean, founded in 1954. Witnessing the three day race (or even a few practices leading up to it, as I did) is such a phenomenal way...
Save Place
0265, Goethals Blvd, Panama
Even travelers who consider themselves averse to cruises seem to feel drawn to a daytime cruise tour of the Panama Canal, and it's easy to understand why: it's a man-made engineering marvel, best seen close up. A full-day tour, which typically...
Save Place
Learn a language at home with CDs or take an immersive class in the country where the language is spoken, bolstering new skills with fun activities like salsa dancing? Option 2, please. Spanish Panama Language School, located in Panama City,...
Save Place
The newly completed Cinta Costera pedestrian park runs the length of Avenida Balboa, between Casco Viego and Punta Patillia. Not only does it connect two popular areas of the city, it also provides continuous sidewalks for walking and biking,...
Save Place
Calle 15 Este, Panamá, Panama
In the early morning, you can stroll by the pier and watch—as the pelicans do—the fishermen deliver the day's catch. Check out the fish market at Avenida Balboa and Calle Eloy Alfaro. On the side of the market, a cluster of local fondas (small...
Save Place
Casco Antiguo, Panama City, Panama
At the Plaza de Francia (French Plaza) and Las Bovedas, not far from the French Embassy, you'll find indigenous Guna Indians (formerly known as Kuna Indians) sewing and selling vibrant molas depicting tropical San Blas Island plants, birds, and...
Save Place
Punta Paitilla, Panama City, Panama
As the sun sets on Panama City, the cityscape begins to sparkle. Punta Paitilla offers impressive views from Balboa Avenue clear to the Metropolitan National Park and Casco Viego. Conversely, as the sun rises, the Metropolitan National Park offers...
Save Place
Puente de las Américas, Panamá, Panama
The Bridge of the Americas is a steel cantilever bridge with a graceful arch that supports the main span. It connects the two sides of the Panama Canal and is an important link on the Pan-American Highway, which runs from Alaska to Patagonia (with...
Save Place
Gatun Locks, Colón, Panama
There's just one spot where you can drive across the Panama Canal's locks - this little swing bridge a the Gatun (Atlantic side) locks. It's an amazing view!
Save Place
Panama
Explore Panama’s tropical rain forest at canopy level with a ride on an aerial tram in Soberanía National Park. Starting on the bank of the Chagres River, the tram is a 20-minute ride to a hilltop observation tower. An onboard naturalist will...
Save Place
Panama City, Panama
The Panama Canal is one of the world’s greatest feats of engineering, and sightseers can get an expansive view of canal operations at the Miraflores Locks, where massive ships are raised and lowered 26 meters (85 feet) between the Pacific Ocean...
Save Place
Calz. de Amador 136, Panamá, Panama
The Biomuseo, or Museo de la Biodiversidad, is one of Panama City’s contemporary gems and the first Latin American project by Frank Gehry. As befits the architect’s unusual and innovative eye, the museum is itself an abstract...
Save Place
Panama City, Panama

It seems surprising that something so simple—water goes up, water goes down—could be so fascinating and popular. But because it is so easy to visit from Panama City, the Miraflores Locks and its visitor center are by far the most...

Save Place
Panama

As you sail through the narrow Culebra Cut, the 220-square-kilometer (85-square-mile) Soberanía National Park stretches past you to your east. In the 16th century, the Las Cruces Trail in this park was used to transport gold. Today, a...

Save Place
Gatun Locks, Colón, Panama

On the canal’s Caribbean side, the Gatún Locks lift ships 26 meters (85 feet), with barely a foot of clearance on either side of the walls for some vessels. The double gates which let in more than 95 million liters (25 million...

Save Place
Puente de las Américas, Panamá, Panama

For 3 million years North and South America were connected by the isthmus that is today Panama. The construction of the canal ruptured geography as well as the flow of traffic for anyone living in the Canal Zone. In 1962, the graceful, mile-long,...

Save Place

The Culebra Cut, which links Gatún Lake with the Pedro Miguel and Miraflores locks, is a catchy name for a channel that the French started digging. Under the Americans, the canal's most backbreaking work took place here where hills once...

Save Place

The junior of the canal’s two bridges, the Centennial Bridge was inaugurated in 2004 and the Pan-American Highway was rerouted to pass over it instead of the older Bridge of the Americas. The Centennial is a gorgeous structure whose 128...

Save Place
Colón, Panama

The Panama Canal Railway has a rich past—literally so, as it was built after California's gold rush to haul spoils back to the East Coast of the United States. Ships would arrive with gold from California, and later the Klondike as well, and...

Save Place
Limon Bay, Colón, Panama

Just inside the breakwaters of Limón Bay on Panama’s Caribbean coast, vessels of all sizes wait their turn to enter the canal—from tugs to tankers, pleasure craft to cargo ships. At the tip of Fort Sherman, a former American...

Save Place
Calle Tobago, Paraíso, Panama

The canal's descent back to sea level begins at the Pedro Miguel Lock, whose single step is almost quaint in comparison what's happening in the canal’s other two sets of locks. Yet, so vitally important is it that Presidents Theodore...

Save Place
Gamboa, Panama

Named for a quincelike fruit, the town of Gamboa lies at the spot where the Chagres River enters Gatún Lake. A single-lane causeway with a lone stoplight helps make this tropical village feel like small-town America. And, for a long time,...

Save Place
Barro Colorado Island, Panama

In reality, the 1,620-hectare (4,000-acre) Barro Colorado Island is a hilltop. Or, at least it was until the creation of Gatún Lake turned it into the largest island in the Canal Zone, one where the Smithsonian Institute operates a research...

Save Place
Gatun Lake, Panama

In the 17th century, the pirate Henry Morgan traveled the Chagres River to attack Panama City. In the early 20th century, the Chagres River was dammed to create the 53-kilometer-long (33-mile-long) Gatún Lake, at the time the largest...

Save Place
Entre Ave. Herrera y Ave. Amador Guerrero, Calle 5ta, Colón 0301-02965, Panama

As you might expect from a city named for Columbus, Colón has a rich and colorful history. While Panama’s outlet to the Caribbean was once flush with stunning colonial architecture, it declined greatly, with many landmark buildings...

Save Place
Amalia Glacier, Natales, Magallanes y la Antártica Chilena Region, Chile

It’s hard for a glacier to stand out in a world of ice fields that enjoy almost celebrity status. But the three-kilometer-wide (two-mile-wide) Amalia Glacier on the Peel Fjord manages to, for its sheer beauty and its thick ice floes...

Save Place

So many grand fjords crisscross Chile’s southern Pacific coast that guiding a ship through the region is like trying to decide which highway off-ramp to take to your next destination. When weather allows, the two-kilometer-wide...

Save Place

Slicing some 130 kilometers (80 miles) north to south, the Sarmiento Channel is named after the 16th-century Spanish navigator and explorer Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa. Along the passage, small fishing boats are utterly dwarfed by the steep slopes...

Save Place
Brüggen Glacier, Chile

 

The towering 60-kilometer-long (37-mile-long) Pío XI Glacier, also called Brüggen, is the granddaddy of all Patagonian glacial ice fields. Located in Bernardo O’Higgins National Park, the glacier takes a 90-degree...

Save Place

If you were ever looking for a place to truly escape the world, work your way through the meandering islands and channels that lead to the secluded Calvo Fjord, weather and ice conditions permitting. Once you’ve taken in the stunning...

Save Place

At three times the size of the Big Island of Hawaii, this is South America’s largest island. Split almost equally between Argentina and Chile, Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego is divided from the mainland by the legendary Strait of Magellan...

Save Place

Horn Island has a cape that juts out of the water like a big horn indeed, but the island that lies where the Atlantic and Pacific collide is in fact named for the Dutch town of Hoorn, which gave financial support to early expeditions here. A...

Save Place

The Yaghan culture flourished for almost 8,000 years, and the coastal people, who number fewer than 2,000 today, influenced Charles Darwin’s thinking regarding the adaptability of humans to various environmental conditions. Their former...

Save Place

The island of Navarino is dominated by the 1,195-meter-high (3,921-foot-high) mountains whose toothlike peaks led to their name, Dientes de Navarino. First settled some 10,000 years ago, the island is today home to around 2,000 people. Like so...

Save Place

Two sets of islands spread over 632 square kilometers (244 square miles) and separated by a narrow channel make up the Cape Horn National Park. The Hermite and Wollaston islands are also part of a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. The windswept islands...

Save Place
Komodo, West Manggarai Regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia
Komodo, Indonesia, is just one of the over 18,000 islands that make up the world’s largest archipelago, but it is decidedly mountainous and shapely. It is part of a national park that has been designated as a World Heritage Site, and is also a...
Save Place
A dozen paying guests and half a dozen crew members set off from Lombok Indonesia to Komodo NP on a 8-day dive trip. The collective sights and travel experience of the group was staggering, but somewhere north of Sumbawa island on our second day...
Save Place
South East Asia
When you visit the 700-square-mile Komodo National Park, you feel like you’re sailing through the Grand Canyon—but one that’s been flooded with crystalline water and fringed with reef. Underwater, the UNESCO World Heritage Site has more than...
Save Place
A bit of searching in google tells you that there are only seven pink beaches in the world. It's a phenomenon that occurs when a mixture of sand from white calcium carbonate combines with the bright red skeletons of organ pipe corals. Pink Beach...
Save Place
It’s exciting walking around Komodo National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site that encompasses three main islands. About 1100 people live in small villages on Komodo island—and about 1218 Komodo dragons. The dragons are wild, which means they...
Save Place
Komodo, West Manggarai Regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia

Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992, Komodo National Park covers vast areas of land and sea between the islands of Sumbawa and Flores. It's much more than the home of the legendary Komodo lizard (aka the Komodo dragon). Terrestrial...

Save Place

The most legendary of the many reptilian and lizard denizens of Komodo, the Komodo dragon is, in fact, a lizard—albeit a very intimidating one. Komodo and Rinca islands, located within Komodo National Park, are the best places to see these...

Save Place

While the Komodo dragons get all the attention on land in this spectacular part of the Indonesian archipelago, it's the kaleidoscope of marine life (over 1,000 species of tropical fish live here) and pristine coral reefs that steal the show...

Save Place

A visit to this Bugis fishing village of around 1,100 people, reached by a 30-minute boat ride from the pier in Komodo National Park, gives an interesting perspective into the realities of life in a very remote corner of the world. The...

Save Place
Taman Nasional Komodo, Komodo, Kabupaten Manggarai Barat, Nusa Tenggara Tim., Indonesia

Perhaps you've seen pink beaches before. But chances are you haven't seen them with a backdrop as spectacular as Komodo National Park's, where fantastical coral formations and swirls of tropical fish wait just steps from a most unique stretch of...

Save Place

There are only four human settlements in Komodo National Park, and the largest of them, Komodo Village, is home to just over 1,500 people. Don't expect to find a choice of boutiques on Komodo Island; you are here to see the animals, not for a day...

Save Place

Located on the north coast of Isla Robinson Crusoe, Cumberland Bay sits in the shadow of the volcanic peaks that form the spine of the island. Along the bay is the island’s only settlement, San Juan Bautista, a quiet town of fishermen living...

Save Place
Saint John Baptist, Juan Fernández, Región de Valparaíso, Chile

Around 700 people live in the only permanent settlement in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, San Juan Bautista on Isla Robinson Crusoe. Although no longer as isolated as it was when Alexander Selkirk, the likely inspiration for Robinson...

Save Place

Three major islands form the Juan Fernández Archipelago National Park: Alexander Selkirk, Robinson Crusoe and Santa Clara. The last is the smallest of the three. Sitting off of the western tip of Robinson Crusoe, the uninhabited Santa...

Save Place
Robinson Crusoe Island, Valparaiso Region, Chile

The Juan Fernández fur seal can be spotted only in the waters around the islands of the archipelago they are named after, as well as in the even more isolated San Felix or Desventuradas islands to the north. These are the world’s...

Save Place

These little birds bear a distinguished name thanks to the fact that they were spotted by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan in 1520. The penguins are found along the coasts of Argentina, Chile and even as far north as Brazil. There is a...