Where are you going?
Or, let us surprise youSpin the Globe ®

Peru, Off the Tourist Path

List View
Map View
Northwest Peru is home to some of the largest pre-Columbian archaeological sites in the Americas and one of the longest-breaking waves in the world. Yet this region, centered around the city of Trujillo, receives a fraction of the visitors who travel to Lima or Cuzco.
Save Place
Huanchaco, Peru
Witness the way surfing has been done for thousands of years at Huanchaco beach, about 20 minutes north of Trujillo. You can take a lesson in riding caballitos de totora (reed boats) from master builders that set up all over the beach. Brothers...
Save Place
Huaca del Sol and Huaca de la Luna (Temples of the Sun and the Moon) can be explored on two-hour tours. At about 100 feet high, the Temple of the Sun is one of the tallest adobe structure in the Americas. A display at the Museo Huacas de Moche...
Save Place
A point break an hour north of Trujillo, Chicama produces some of the longest left-hand waves in the world. Surfers should book a room at the Chicama Surf Resort; a Zodiac service tows guests back after long rides. During Semana Santa (Holy Week,...
Save Place
Peru
The 85-acre Chaparrí Reserve is named for Chaparrí Mountain, considered sacred by Peruvian shamans. The dry forest is home to animals such as the llamalike guanaco, the Andean condor, and the spectacled bear (shown above). Reservations required....
Save Place
Built of mud and adobe, Chan Chan—the nine-square-mile former capital of the Chimú empire (850–1470)—was the most expansive city of its time. Wander along pathways with a guide to see wall reliefs that depict creatures from the nearby Pacific. You...
Save Place
Peru
At the Brujo archaeological complex roughly 40 miles from Trujillo, the remains of a Mochica high priestess, the Governess of Cao, were discovered in 2005. At the Cao Museum, travelers can view La Señora de Cao’s mummified body, featuring spider...
Save Place
485, Jirón Independencia, Trujillo 15333, Peru
Built in the 1940s as lodging for monks, the Libertador Trujillo features rooms with Moorish-style wooden balconies. They were patterned after those used during Spanish rule to prevent women from being seen from the street. Don’t miss a breakfast...