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Eco Adventures in St. Vincent and the Grenadines

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St. Vincent and the Grenadines are home to some miraculous nature, from a volcanic crater and its residual lava flow to waterfalls, black-sand beaches, a saltwater pond, and more. Experience it all on a hike, in a garden, or at various lookout points around the islands.
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From this 900-foot-high viewing platform—equipped with a telescope, map, and signage—you have a panoramic view of the majestic Mesopotamia Valley (“Mespo”), home to St. Vincent’s fruit, vegetable, and spice crops. A...
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You’ll likely do your sunbathing and swimming on the white-sand beaches of the Grenadines, but St. Vincent's black-sand beaches are also quite stunning. In Biabou, for example, along the windward coast south of Georgetown, you can stare for...
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Deep in the wilderness about an hour’s drive north of Kingstown, Dark View Falls cascade off a cliff and into a pair of natural pools, where everyone gathers to swim in the crisp, clear water. The hike to the falls takes only about 10 to 15...
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Locals consider La Soufrière—St. Vincent’s massive active volcano that last erupted in 1979—the “queen of climbs.” Approachable from either the leeward or windward coast, the hike to the 4,000-foot summit is a...
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Drive through picturesque Mesopotamia Valley, the fertile breadbasket of St. Vincent, to get to Montreal Gardens, a private mountainside oasis of exotic plants, shrubs, and trees located 1,500 feet above sea level. More wild jungle than planned...
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Left to nature, only one in a thousand turtle hatchlings reach maturity. At Old Hegg Turtle Sanctuary, however, Orton “Brother” King is working to change that statistic. On the island of Bequia, he finds and protects turtle eggs,...
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On St. Vincent’s far northeastern coast, you’ll find the Owia Salt Pond, created by ocean waves continuously flowing over a natural reef. Surrounded by volcanic rock and coral formations, the pool is traditionally used as a therapeutic...
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When La Soufrière erupted in 1902, lava flowed down to the sea and created a five-mile-long moonscape on the volcano’s east slope. Today, if you visit during a tropical rain shower, you’ll see the riverbed transform almost...
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Around since 1765, the St. Vincent Botanical Gardens claims to be the oldest of its kind in the Western Hemisphere. Tour the gardens with an informative guide, who will point out all the native and exotic plants growing here, including a...
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The well-marked Vermont Nature Trail in St. Vincent’s Buccament Valley, about a half-hour north of Kingstown, passes through the lush forest of the St. Vincent Parrot Reserve and crosses several flowing streams. Two miles long and relatively...