Where are you going?
Or, let us surprise youSpin the Globe ®

Traditional Hot Drinks Around the World

Traditional Hot Drinks Around the World
Traditional Hot Drinks Around the World
The holiday season is upon us, which means that for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere, winter is coming (cue Game of Thrones joke here). The holidays are generally considered a heartwarming time of year; however, when it comes to the weather, they are normally anything but warm.

Scroll through the slideshow for a look at delicious traditional hot drinks around the world that’ll keep you feeling cozy no matter where you are.

Photo by Margie Savage/Flickr
By Sarah Buder, AFAR Staff
  • 1 / 9
    Traditional Hot Drinks Around the World
    Traditional Hot Drinks Around the World
    The holiday season is upon us, which means that for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere, winter is coming (cue Game of Thrones joke here). The holidays are generally considered a heartwarming time of year; however, when it comes to the weather, they are normally anything but warm. Scroll through the slideshow for a look at delicious traditional hot drinks around the world that’ll keep you feeling cozy no matter where you are.

    Photo by Margie Savage/Flickr
  • 2 / 9
    Yerba Mate
    Yerba Mate
    Yerba mate, otherwise known as mate, is traditionally drunk in many countries throughout South America. The leaves of this plant—which grows in Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina—are dried and steeped in hot water to make an herbal tea that is said to relieve fatigue, help treat headaches, and promote weight loss. Drinking mate is not only healthy, but it’s also a social ritual in many South American countries, including Chile, where friends share mate at any hour of the day.

    Photo by mrlasse/Flickr
  • 3 / 9
    Matcha
    Matcha
    Matcha originated in Chinese Zen monasteries, but has since become extremely popular throughout Japan. This finely powdered green tea is thought to embody the spirit of meditation. Modern tea ceremonies in both Japan and China focus intently on the farming, preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha as hot tea. The powder is now also used to flavor a variety of Japanese delicacies.

    Photo by ejstanz/Flickr
  • 4 / 9
    Masala Chai
    Masala Chai
    Chai, which means tea, is enjoyed all over the world, but the spiced milk tea’s origins are in India, where it’s known as masala chai. Masala refers to the combination of black tea, milk, and spices—normally including cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and pepper—which are heated and blended in a large kettle or pot and later served in small cups.

    Photo by Margie Savage/Flickr
  • 5 / 9
    Hot Toddy
    Hot Toddy
    The people of Ireland, England, and Scotland are no strangers to dreary weather, so it doesn’t come as a surprise that one of the world’s most beloved cold weather cocktails was created in the United Kingdom. The hot toddy—aside from being an amusing drink to order—is thought to have throat-soothing abilities. The drink, which is usually made from a mixture of whiskey, cinnamon, hot water, honey, and lemon, has been used to help treat symptoms of the common cold. 

    Photo by Kenn WIlson/Flickr
  • 6 / 9
    Coca Tea
    Coca Tea
    Coca tea, or mate de coca, is an herbal tea made from the leaves of the coca plant. It is most popularly drunk in Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru, and has traditionally been used to combat fatigue and hunger. Coca tea is often drunk in the high Andes of South America because it is considered highly effective in treating altitude sickness.

    Photo by Calsidyrose/Flickr
  • 7 / 9
    Maghrebi Mint Tea
    Maghrebi Mint Tea
    Maghrebi mint tea, also known as Moroccan mint tea, is a hot green tea, normally prepared with spearmint leaves and sugar. The drink originated in the Greater Maghreb region of Morocco and is now a central part of social life and cultural customs throughout many parts of the country. Typically, at least three glasses are served and offered to house guests as a sign of hospitality, prepared by the head of the household. It is considered impolite to refuse. 

    Photo by Liz Mochrie/Flickr
  • 8 / 9
    Glühwein
    Glühwein
    The German version of mulled wine, Glühwein, translates roughly to “glow-wine,” but we tend to just call it “delicious.” The hot beverage—which is traditionally served in both Germany and Austria during the holidays—is made from heated red wine spiced with cinnamon sticks, cloves, citrus, and sugar. 

    Photo by ume-y/Flickr
  • 9 / 9
    What’s Next...