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The 7 Most European Places in the United States

The 7 Most European Places in the United States
The 7 Most European Places in the United States
Sometimes it’s hard to organize a trip overseas. Luckily, there’s culture to be found everywhere—sometimes even right in your own backyard. These seven locations are undeniably American, but have a unique European history and influence that makes them culturally rich—and visually beautiful—places to visit. Scroll through the slideshow to see the seven most European places in the United States.

Photo by Alex Proimos/Flickr
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    The 7 Most European Places in the United States
    The 7 Most European Places in the United States
    Sometimes it’s hard to organize a trip overseas. Luckily, there’s culture to be found everywhere—sometimes even right in your own backyard. These seven locations are undeniably American but have a unique European history and influence that makes them culturally rich—and visually beautiful—places to visit. Scroll through the slideshow to see the seven most European places in the United States.


    Photo by Alex Proimos/Flickr
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    Solvang, California
    Solvang, California
    Solvang, a small town nestled between the sprawling hills and ocean in Santa Barbara County, was established when Danish settlers came to the area in the 19th and 20th centuries. The overtly Danish architecture found in Solvang dates back to mid-20th century, when Solvang’s population realized it could be a tourist destination for its uniquely Scandinavian feel.

    Photo by Prayitno/Flickr
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    Boston, Massachussetts
    Boston, Massachussetts
    Boston—one of the first U.S. cities—became home to a number of European settlers in the late 16th century, most of whom moved from the United Kingdom. Boston’s cultural roots, cuisine, religion and dialect are English and Irish in origin, and many vestiges of Anglo-Irish culture are seen today in the lifestyles of its residents. Beacon Hill, one of the oldest neighborhoods, almost feels like London with its historic townhouses and cobblestone streets.

    Photo by Jeff Gunn/Flickr
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    New Orleans, Louisiana
    New Orleans, Louisiana
    The Big Easy is home to some of the most lasting examples of French and Spanish colonial architecture in the United States. New Orleans was founded by the French and held under Spanish rule in the 18th century. Later, the influx of European immigrants helped to create the distinctive melting pot of the city’s vibrant creole culture that we see today.

    Photo by Sarah Buder
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    Fredericksburg, Texas
    Fredericksburg, Texas
    Fredericksburg was founded in 1846 by German immigrants who came to America to escape difficult conditions in their country. The Texas town showcases typical German architecture, and a variation of the language—called Texan-German—can still be heard there. Fredericksburg celebrates its German origins in cuisine, music, and an annual Oktoberfest.

    Photo by Reinhard Link/Flickr
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    San Francisco, California
    San Francisco, California
    San Francisco is Spanish in its name and also in its heritage. The city has become known to some as “the Paris of the West” thanks to its liberal culture and music and arts scene.

    Photo by Alex Proimos/Flickr
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    Venice, California
    Venice, California
    Southern California’s Venice not only shares its name with the famed Italian city, but its man-made canals were also specifically built to resemble the ones in Venice, Italy. In much of the area, cars are forbidden, so you can wander the streets and walking bridges—transporting yourself to the Grand Canal—and feel the romance of Italy in the air.

    Photo by Sylvain Leprovost
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    Calistoga, California
    Calistoga, California
    Calistoga doesn’t have specific ties to European history, but as an internationally renowned wine region with vineyard-covered hills and terra-cotta villas separated by quaint towns, we bet you’d mistake it for Tuscany if you didn’t know any better.

    Photo by Jim G/Flickr
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