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Get Active on Turks and Caicos

Scuba Diving
Get Active on Turks and Caicos
The Turks and Caicos Islands offer plenty of active and exotic adventures, from exploring one of the largest reefs in the world, to kayaking through mangroves, to spelunking limestone caves. For the less active, there is always pirate booty to discover and conch to crack.
Photo courtesy of Turks and Caicos Department of Tourism
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    Scuba Diving
    Scuba Diving
    The Turks and Caicos Islands are surrounded by one of the largest coral reefs in the world, with miles of underwater walls and sea life providing first-rate scuba diving. Along with sightings of reef fish and sea turtles, lucky divers have reported encounters with bull sharks and humpback whales. Tour operators such as Blue Whale Excursions and Big Blue Unlimited frequently take guests out to incredible spots, including the Columbus Passage, West Caicos Walls, Columbus Landfall National Park, and the Endymion, a 19th-century British warship located south of Deanne's Dock.
    Photo courtesy of Turks and Caicos Department of Tourism
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    Conch Tastings
    Conch Tastings
    Whether you like it frittered, fried, cracked, or raw, you’re sure to taste delicious conch no matter where you are on the Turks and Caicos Islands. In a place that takes shellfish so seriously—with conch massages, conch farms, and even conch whisperers—it may seem daunting to find the best catch on the island. Daniel’s Café by the Sea is famed for its conch chowder, and Da Conch Shack is an island mainstay. Locals know that although Da Conch Shack was the first on the islands, not too long ago the original owner left to open up Bugaloo's Conch Crawl in the Blue Hills neighborhood. There, he serves his secret conch salad and cracked-conch recipes to a crowd consistently packed with locals in an amazing location.
    Photo by Kristy Alpert
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    Kayak Safaris
    Kayak Safaris
    Embracing the wild side of Turks and Caicos is easy, especially with so many eco-conscious tour guides eager to offer up a mix of adventure and insight into the islands' impressive conservation efforts. Most tour operators offer kayak excursions along the remote marine preserves in Frenchman’s Creek Nature Reserve, where you can hop off for a tour of "Iguana Island" (formally known as Little Water Cay), and on the uninhabited islands of Middle and East Caicos. The romantically isolated sandbar along Half Moon Bay makes a great destination for kayakers from Provo.
    Photo by Kristy Alpert
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    Sportfishing Adventures
    Sportfishing Adventures
    Go sportfishing with the right guide in the Turks and Caicos Islands, and you can have your first hook just one mile off the marina. While wahoo, mahimahi, and cobia are favorites for big-game fishing, locals know it isn’t just about the size of the fish. Even Belongers rave about the thrill of bonefishing in the tidal flats; check out Bonefish Unlimited to experience one of the most exciting fighters in the sea. Get a true taste of how locals catch their dinner by taking a conch cruise or lobster-spearing excursion on a catamaran (complete with waterslide!) through Blue Whale Excursions. Be sure to keep your catch, as most hotel chefs are more than happy to cook up whatever you bring back.
    Photo by age fotostock
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    Spelunking in Middle Caicos
    Spelunking in Middle Caicos
    The Turks and Caicos Islands are home to the largest above-water cave system in the Caribbean, the national park Conch Bar Caves. These caves are formed through saltwater eroding the limestone formations around the park. You can spend an entire day and have a ton of fun spelunking these primitive hollows. As there aren’t any paths or lighting systems in place, it’s best to book a tour for your first time. Several outfitters offer guided spelunking trips that mix a day of snorkeling in a world of coral and fish with caving in a world of stalactites and stalagmites. If you don't want to enter the dark, you can explore by peering into the Hole, a limestone sinkhole that provides a more vertical look inside a cave, or check out the openings in the cliffs at water level along spectacular Mudjin Harbor.
    Photo courtesy of Turks and Caicos Department of Tourism
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    Haunted Turks and Caicos
    Haunted Turks and Caicos
    The Turks and Caicos Islands were once a favored haunt for pirates before salt miners came in with slaves in tow. Although both industries have long since dissolved in the region, each left their mark on the islands—and in some cases are still haunting them. A sign out front of the Coverley House on Grand Turk warns of a plump, one-armed apparition that has roamed the halls since the 19th century. Just offshore, the shipwreck of La Famille Express beckons brave snorkelers to swim around the supposedly haunted ship among reef fish, sea turtles, and, perhaps, shipwrecked ghosts.
    Photo by Kristy Alpert
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    Release Your Inner Pirate
    Release Your Inner Pirate
    Explore the swashbuckling lore of the Turks and Caicos Islands by retracing the steps of notorious pirates such as Calico Jack, whose two equally fearsome female lieutenants, Anne Bonny and Mary Read, often disguised themselves as men aboard his ship. Planned excursions, such as Sun Charters' Pirate Cruise and Ocean Outback’s Infamous Pirate Cove Adventure Cruise, will take you to wreck sites and pirate haunts before setting you free along the beach to search for buried treasure. Some say that Captain William Kidd's famed "Two hundred bars of gold / And rix dollars manifold" could be stashed away within the Turks and Caicos island chain. Happy hunting!
    Photo by Kristy Alpert
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    Board Sports
    Board Sports
    It’s easy to get on board, literally, with an active lifestyle while on the Turks and Caicos Islands. The breezy weather and typically calm waters make windsurfing extremely popular with both locals and tourists, and companies such as Abuv-It-All (aka Windsurfing Provo) can teach you all there is to know about navigating the waters atop a board. Kiteboarding is also popular all over the island, and outfitters and rental shops know the best spots for each skill level: Kiteboarding safaris are available for the more advanced, while calmer paddleboard safaris through mangroves (day or night) are for the wind shy.
    Photo by Kristy Alpert