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10 Captivating Photos from a Namibian Desert

Just Say Rhino
10 Captivating Photos from a Namibian Desert
See desert wildlife and landscape through the camera lens of traveler Sarah Gold during a trip to Namibia, filled with unexpected moments that put you in the middle of the action.
Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Just Say Rhino
    Just Say Rhino
    A male rhino (deliberately dehorned to discourage poachers) mock-charges a group of visitors who unintentionally roused him from a nap.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Keeping Track
    Keeping Track
    Dr. Philip “Flip” Stander, who has studied Namibian desert lions for more than 30 years, tracks lions’ movements by their satellite radio collars. Living in his truck for weeks at a time, he often writes the lions’ GPS coordinates on his body so he can remember them.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Kunene’s Gorge
    Kunene’s Gorge
    Punishingly dry, the Kunene region’s landscapes include red-rock escarpments and deep gorges.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Leopard Cub
    Leopard Cub
    A rare sighting of a leopard cub at Okonjima, a private, 55,000-acre nature preserve where dozens of cheetahs, leopards, and lions live.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Young Male Lions
    Young Male Lions
    Two young male lions, part of a group being studied by Dr. Stander, asleep on a dune in the Hoanib River valley.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
  • 6 / 11
    Camp Staffer
    Camp Staffer
    A staffer named Desert Rose, at Desert Rhino Camp in Damaraland—an area that is home to the largest population of wild black rhino in Africa.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Keeping Close Watch
    Keeping Close Watch
    Though Dr. Stander has fitted some of the lions he studies with satellite radio collars, he never interacts with them. “They know my truck,” he says, “but I don’t think they’ve ever actually seen me.”
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Rough Roads
    Rough Roads
    Most of the roads that crisscross the Kunene region are unpaved, unmarked, and bone-rattlingly rough.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Roaming Zebras
    Roaming Zebras
    Zebras, like other Namibian desert-adapted species, subsist in extremely hardscrabble conditions.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    Cheetah Release
    Cheetah Release
    Releasing a cheetah back into the wild after its annual veterinary checkup at Okonjima preserve.
    Photo by Sarah Gold
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    What’s Next . . .
    What’s Next . . .
    Courtesy of National Park Services