Where are you going?
Or, let us surprise youSpin the Globe ®

Reykjavik

Reykjavík, Iceland
Plane loader
Animated dots
Colorful Reykjavik  Reykjavik  Iceland
Hallgrímskirkja Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' REYKJAVIK  Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' Reykjavik with Kids Reykjavik  Iceland
Red, White and Blue Reykjavik  Iceland
Quirky Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Morning Alpenglow Reykjavik  Iceland
Now That's Some Fish 'n Chips Reykjavik  Iceland
A Cozy Place For Dinner Reykjavik  Iceland
A Splash Of Lime   Reykjavik  Iceland
Viking Skeleton Ship Covered In Snow Reykjavik  Iceland
Deja Vu  Reykjavik  Iceland
"Posturinn" Reykjavik  Iceland
There's Nothing Like Fresh Snowfall Reykjavik  Iceland
Splashes of Color Reykjavik  Iceland
Mmm....Boats Reykjavik  Iceland
Garðskagaviti Lighthouse, Western Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
"Hlolla Batar":  Must Be Icelandic For "Delicious" Reykjavik  Iceland
Warm and Cozy Dinner Reykjavik  Iceland
"Wanna Trade Places?" Reykjavik  Iceland
Fresh Snow In the Morning Reykjavik  Iceland
"Noodle Soup" Reykjavik  Iceland
Steamy Moss Reykjavik  Iceland
Cold, But Hot Too Reykjavik  Iceland
A truly Icelandic weekend Reykjavik  Iceland
Goodbye, Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
Snowfall in the Morning Reykjavik  Iceland
Made From Fire, Not Ice Reykjavik  Iceland
Remoteness Defined Reykjavik  Iceland
Colorful Mineral Deposits Reykjavik  Iceland
Paint the Town Red.  And Blue.  And Yellow.  And Green. Reykjavik  Iceland
Harpa at sunrise Reykjavik  Iceland
Lost in colors? :)  Reykjavik  Iceland
The colorful capital of Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
A city fueled by caffeine and music Reykjavik  Iceland
The unrestrained color palette of Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Have you buckled up? Reykjavik  Iceland
Get Your Kicks on Ring Road  Reykjavik  Iceland
Reykjavik:  A Winter Wonderland Reykjavik  Iceland
Harmonic Harpa Reykjavik  Iceland
The Impressive But Not-Easy-To-Pronounce Valahnjukur Rock Formations Reykjavik  Iceland
Steaming Hot Mud Pots on a Frigid Winter's Day in Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
Enjoying a Dinner of Svið Reykjavik  Iceland
Reykjavik Graffiti I Reykjavik  Iceland
Hunt for Street Art in Reykjavic Reykjavik  Iceland
Skógafoss Waterfall Reykjavik  Iceland
Reykjavik Graffiti Reykjavik  Iceland
Feeding the Birds at Tjörnin Reykjavik  Iceland
Colorful Reykjavik  Reykjavik  Iceland
Hallgrímskirkja Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' REYKJAVIK  Reykjavik  Iceland
Rockin' Reykjavik with Kids Reykjavik  Iceland
Red, White and Blue Reykjavik  Iceland
Quirky Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Morning Alpenglow Reykjavik  Iceland
Now That's Some Fish 'n Chips Reykjavik  Iceland
A Cozy Place For Dinner Reykjavik  Iceland
A Splash Of Lime   Reykjavik  Iceland
Viking Skeleton Ship Covered In Snow Reykjavik  Iceland
Deja Vu  Reykjavik  Iceland
"Posturinn" Reykjavik  Iceland
There's Nothing Like Fresh Snowfall Reykjavik  Iceland
Splashes of Color Reykjavik  Iceland
Mmm....Boats Reykjavik  Iceland
Garðskagaviti Lighthouse, Western Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
"Hlolla Batar":  Must Be Icelandic For "Delicious" Reykjavik  Iceland
Warm and Cozy Dinner Reykjavik  Iceland
"Wanna Trade Places?" Reykjavik  Iceland
Fresh Snow In the Morning Reykjavik  Iceland
"Noodle Soup" Reykjavik  Iceland
Steamy Moss Reykjavik  Iceland
Cold, But Hot Too Reykjavik  Iceland
A truly Icelandic weekend Reykjavik  Iceland
Goodbye, Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
Snowfall in the Morning Reykjavik  Iceland
Made From Fire, Not Ice Reykjavik  Iceland
Remoteness Defined Reykjavik  Iceland
Colorful Mineral Deposits Reykjavik  Iceland
Paint the Town Red.  And Blue.  And Yellow.  And Green. Reykjavik  Iceland
Harpa at sunrise Reykjavik  Iceland
Lost in colors? :)  Reykjavik  Iceland
The colorful capital of Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
A city fueled by caffeine and music Reykjavik  Iceland
The unrestrained color palette of Reykjavik Reykjavik  Iceland
Have you buckled up? Reykjavik  Iceland
Get Your Kicks on Ring Road  Reykjavik  Iceland
Reykjavik:  A Winter Wonderland Reykjavik  Iceland
Harmonic Harpa Reykjavik  Iceland
The Impressive But Not-Easy-To-Pronounce Valahnjukur Rock Formations Reykjavik  Iceland
Steaming Hot Mud Pots on a Frigid Winter's Day in Iceland Reykjavik  Iceland
Enjoying a Dinner of Svið Reykjavik  Iceland
Reykjavik Graffiti I Reykjavik  Iceland
Hunt for Street Art in Reykjavic Reykjavik  Iceland
Skógafoss Waterfall Reykjavik  Iceland
Reykjavik Graffiti Reykjavik  Iceland
Feeding the Birds at Tjörnin Reykjavik  Iceland

Colorful Reykjavik

We got to Reykjavik on a rainy night, and the first thing I saw and heard was a lot of people in the street partying and Cher's "Believe" blasting from some club, loud enough to hear it everywhere. I though then that this place was crazy, but then daytime came and saw its beauty and the genuine kindness of its people and felt like home.

One of my favorite things in Reykjavik is the colorful houses. So vibrant and beautiful, I could stare at them forever. So completely different from any other city I have seen in Europe, and I have seen many...

More Recommendations

over 4 years ago

Hallgrímskirkja

The Hallgrímskirkja - church of Hallgrímur is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft), it is the largest church in Iceland and the sixth tallest architectural structure in Iceland after Longwave radio mast Hellissandur, the radio masts of US Navy at Grindavík, Eiðar longwave transmitter and Smáratorg tower.The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614 to 1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

I loved it very much, very different from the churches you see around Europe. The inside is very modest, no paintings at all. The organ though is very impressive. The statue outside of it is a present from the United States and it represents Leif the Lucky, discoverer of North America. For 750 krona you can go up in the tower and see the entire city, very nice view. Kids go free :)
over 4 years ago

Rockin' Reykjavik with Kids

Outskirts of REYKJAVIK, Iceland --- We travelled on the Golden Circle, a popular tourist route that covers about 300 km with primary stops that include national park Þingvellir, the waterfall Gullfoss (meaning "golden falls"), and the geothermally active valley of Haukadalur, which contains the geysers Geysir and Strokkurc. However no guidebook will ever tell you how strong the gusts of wind can really be while visiting these sites. Out of nowhere strong winds can literally sweep you off your feet. Have you ever had this happen to you?
over 4 years ago

Rockin' REYKJAVIK

REYKJAVIK, Iceland -- Harpa-Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Center -- costing roughly £150 million -- opened its doors a few months ago. Designed by the award-winning architectural team Henning Larsen Architects in collaboration with world renowned artist Ólafur Eliasson, the place is a gem. Don't you think?
over 4 years ago

Rockin' Reykjavik

REYKJAVIK, Iceland -- Harpa-Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Center -- costing roughly £150 million -- opened its doors a few months ago. Designed by the award-winning architectural team Henning Larsen Architects in collaboration with world renowned artist Ólafur Eliasson, the place is a gem. Don't you think?
over 4 years ago

Rockin' Reykjavik

REYKJAVIK, Iceland -- Harpa-Reykjavik Concert Hall and Conference Center -- costing roughly £150 million -- opened its doors a few months ago. Designed by the award-winning architectural team Henning Larsen Architects in collaboration with world renowned artist Ólafur Eliasson, the place is a gem. Don't you think?
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Cold, But Hot Too

Visiting Iceland, one of the things you notice most is the contrasts that run throughout the country. These geothermal pools near the Blue Lagoon outside Reykjavik are a prime example of that. There was snow covering the hills surrounding the pools and it was maybe 30 degrees, but the geothermal pools in front of the snow-covered hill were so hot that you couldn't get too close to them. Although the sulfur smell of the geothermal pools wasn't that pleasant, the warm steam felt really good.

As I took in dramatic scenes like this one around every turn I realized why they call Iceland "The Land of Fire and Ice"!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Steamy Moss

Iceland, known for its geothermal activity, has many interesting thermal pools near the Blue Lagoon outside Reykjavik that I would recommend on any trip to the area. We found the landscape at the thermal pools to be so beautiful and dramatic - it was the only greenery we saw on our whole trip to Iceland.

The misty steam floating over the bright green moss and dark, jagged rocks made for an otherworldly scene I won't soon forget.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

"Noodle Soup"

Wandering through Reykjavik on a cold January night, nothing sounded better to my husband and me than a bowl of piping hot noodle soup to wrap our hands around. This place didn't disappoint!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Fresh Snow In the Morning

My husband and I spent our last day in Iceland exploring the beautiful capital city of Reykjavik. We were lucky enough to wake up to a fresh coating of snow that had fallen overnight, blanketing everything with a fluffy whiteness that made an already beautiful city all the more spectacular.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

"Wanna Trade Places?"

Wandering through Reykjavik in January, I noticed this wistful dog hanging out in the window watching the world go by. I couldn't help but think how ironic it was that while he looked like he wished he was outside playing in the snow and enjoying the cold weather I was wishing I was defrosting inside his warm house.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Warm and Cozy Dinner

One of my favorite things to do when wandering around beautiful Reykjavik on a cold January night was to watch people enjoying dinner with their families and friends in the city's many tasty restaurants. Like this one, the restaurants were all so warm and inviting, offering fresh seafood and delicious Icelandic dishes. The coziness of the restaurants made me feel warmer just walking by.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

"Hlolla Batar": Must Be Icelandic For "Delicious"

A lot of people rave about Iceland's famed hot dogs, which are delicious, but my husband and I were surprised to find their sandwiches, or "boats," to be equally impressive.

"Hlolla Batar" was one of the tastiest sandwich shops we came across in Reykjavik, offering an extensive menu with something for everyone - a delicious and affordable option in a country that can be a tad expensive.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Garðskagaviti Lighthouse, Western Iceland

The charming red and white Garðskagaviti lighthouse near Keflavik is Ideland's tallest. Built in 1944, the lighthouse was a gift from American servicemen grateful for being rescued from a sinking U.S. Coast Guard vessel.

You can climb all the way to the top of the lighthouse for an amazing 360-degree view. But no matter the time of year, you're bound to be met with a strong wind blowing in off the ocean - pleasant in the summer but a big chilly in the winter. But even in the winter, the endless panoramic view from the lighthouse, as well as the stately lighthouse itself, makes it more than worth a visit.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Mmm....Boats

One of the best things to eat in Iceland, aside from the obvious fresh seafood and their famed hot dogs, is fresh sandwiches, which they call "boats." My husband and I speculated that they call their sandwiches boats because they're served in hollowed-out bread (think oversized hot dog bun) that cradles the filling inside, much like a boat with its passengers. Stuffed full of the filling of your choice and tossed on a grill for a minute to warm them up, boats are a perfect way to warm up on even the chilliest Icelandic day.

Especially when you're in Reykjavik, if you're looking for a quick, cheap alternative to standard Icelandic fare I highly recommend a pipin' hot boat.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Splashes of Color

Wandering through Reykjavik, one of the things that surprised me was how colorful the city is. I don't know if it's because the city gets limited sunshine and a lot of snow in the winter or what, but at every turn in Reykjavik we came across murals and buildings painted in every color of the rainbow. Just the thing to life the spirits on a dreary winter day!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

There's Nothing Like Fresh Snowfall

Our last day in Iceland, we woke up in Reykjavik to fresh snowfall that blanketed the city and made it even more spectacular. My husband and I seemed to be the only ones walking around at 9:30 on a Sunday morning, and we were treated to a wonderful stillness and beauty in the city that only snowfall can bring.

Walking through Reykjavik that morning, streets covered in fluffy whiteness, was the last thing we did before heading home, and it made for a wonderful memory of magical Iceland.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

"Posturinn"

Everything enchanted me about Iceland, even the colorful mailboxes I found throughout Reykjavik. Icelanders must be big letter writers because there seemed to be a mailbox on just about every corner. I loved how the fresh white snow looked against the crisp red box.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Deja Vu

Wandering through the quiet, snowy streets of Reykjavik early on a January morning I came across these little guys cheerfully lining the window. I was immediately struck with the strangest sense of deja vu - I'd seen this scene before. And then it hit me. While strolling through the streets of Venice last May I'd come across an almost identical arrangement decorating an almost identical window! I had to laugh: No matter the country, I guess Snow White and the Seven Dwarves always manage to make people smile.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Viking Skeleton Ship Covered In Snow

Our last morning in Reykjavik, fresh snow covering the ground, we walked the easy walk down to the shore and saw that this statue of a skeleton Viking ship had a whole new sense of drama from what it had the day before, thanks to a powdery blanket of snow. Called the "Sun Voyager," the metal statue was made by artist Jon Gunnar Arnason and is a smaller version of the boats the Vikings used in their conquest of much of the Northern Hemisphere.

It's a quick walk from anywhere in downtown Reykjavik to see the statue, and it's best to visit in the morning or evening when (if you're lucky) the sun bathes it in a serene pink alpenglow.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

A Splash Of Lime

One of the best things about Reykjavik is the unexpected jolts of color splashed throughout the city. On practically every street there's a house or wall or office building covered with bright murals or painted in bold orange, red, purple, or, in this case, lime green paint. This house was lively and cheerful even on an otherwise overcast and dreary day.

It's hard to feel down for very long when wandering through Reykjavik - when you turn the next corner you'll see something quirky and colorful that'll make you smile.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

A Cozy Place For Dinner

Wandering through Reykjavik on a cold January night, I loved how cozy and welcoming all the restaurants looked. This table for two was practically calling for my husband and I to come in and warm up over a delicious Icelandic dinner.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Now That's Some Fish 'n Chips

One of the things I was really looking forward to on my trip to Iceland this January was tasting the local cuisine. Icelandic fish and chips was on the top of my list, and it was as delicious as I was expecting.

My husband and I ate at the appropriately named Icelandic Fish & Chips (http://www.fishandchips.is/), recommended by the concierge at our hotel. A quick walk from our downtown hotel, this organic bistro uses a special healthier batter made from spelt and barley, making it both light and crispy at the same time. Probably the best fish and chips I've ever eaten, and affordable to boot!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Morning Alpenglow

Our last morning in Reykjavik, my husband and I awoke to a fresh blanket of fluffy snow coating the city. The crisp white snow transformed an already beautiful city, and as we wandered the empty streets we felt as if we had all of Reykjavik to ourselves. The morning light created an otherworldly alpenglow, bathing the city with soft pinks and baby blues. Not a morning I'll soon forget!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Quirky Reykjavik

One of the best things about Reykjavik is the quirky, humorous artwork you find scattered throughout the city. I don't know if the brightly-colored murals like this one are intended to ward off the blues brought on by the long Icelandic winters but that's definitely the result - you simply can't look at funny aliens and trolls like these and the bold multi-colored buildings throughout the city and be in anything but a great mood.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Red, White and Blue

During our trip to Iceland this January, my husband and I took a drive to the charming red and white Garðskagaviti lighthouse near Keflavik. The lighthouse is the tallest in Iceland and was built in 1944 as a gift from American servicemen grateful for being rescued from a sinking U.S. Coast Guard vessel.

I loved the red and white of the lighthouse against the brilliant blue sky. We were the only ones willing to venture out in the blustery cold to visit the lighthouse so we had it to ourselves. We were so glad we took the time for a visit - definitely worth a trip.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Paint the Town Red. And Blue. And Yellow. And Green.

If I could pick one word to describe Reykjavik it definitely would be "quirky" - in a great way. Icelanders living in the capitol city have created a wonderful sense of whimsy throughout the town, and you'll see many blocks like this with eye-popping splashes of color and fanciful murals.

I don't know if it's to offset the gloomy winter days or for some other reason, but Reykjavik residents seem determined to fill their town with color, charm, and whimsy - sure to make you smile even on the most frigid, overcast day. They took the idea of painting the town red to a whole new level!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Colorful Mineral Deposits

Visiting Iceland in January, my husband and I decided we wanted to see some of Iceland's geothermal activity up close, so we drove to a little area outside Reykjavik, near the Blue Lagoon, called Seltun that's known for its geothermal pools, steam vents, and pots of bubbling mud. I loved the colorful minerals the sulfuric water left behind - shades of blue, gold, green.

I found Iceland to be a land of contrasts - light vs. dark, soft vs. hard, modern vs. traditional. The mud pots and bubbling pools introduced me to another stark contrast: frigid cold vs. boiling hot.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Remoteness Defined

Driving through a remote stretch of Iceland near the fascinating Seltun geothermal area outside Reykjavik, I was struck by how self-sufficient and strong you have to be to live in Iceland, especially in the long, cold winter months. This was a farm in the countryside, and the next-closest neighbor had to be at least 15 miles away.

I knew that Iceland was very unpopulated, with just over 300,000 people living in the whole country with one-third of them in Reykjavik. But I was still surprised by how few people we saw once we got outside Reykjavik. We would literally drive for hours without passing another car.

Iceland is an amazing country, and I was thrilled to be able to visit in winter when the moody clouds and fresh snow added drama and mystery to everything.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Made From Fire, Not Ice

Just outside Reykjavik, my husband and I happened upon an area called Seltun that was replete with geothermal activity - steaming vents, bubbling mud pots. The air was thick with sulfur that smelled like rotten eggs, and water and mud boiled in exposed pools, leaving behind interesting mineral deposits and formations.

When I first saw this mud pot I thought it looked like ice, which would make sense for Iceland in January. But these mud pots were actually boiling hot, and the holes in the top layer were caused by the very opposite of ice: hot water bubbling up and out of the pots.

Iceland is a country of amazing contrasts, in this case steaming hot mud on a cold winter's day.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Snowfall in the Morning

On our last morning in amazing Iceland, my husband and I awoke in Reykjavik to a coat of fresh snowfall blanketing the city. I had already fallen in love with Reykjavik when it wasn't covered in snow. I loved the quirky sense of humor in its artwork and architecture, its seeming obsession with hot dogs and dairy products, its cute boutiques and world-class restaurants. But when I woke on this morning and saw Reykjavik under a blanket of fresh, white snow, my love affair with the city moved to a whole new level.

We were the only people out walking on this morning as it was still early by Icelandic standards, around 9:30 or so with the sun just rising and hidden behind the moody storm clouds. My husband and I walked the streets for about an hour virtually without seeing another soul, enjoying the peace and quiet of this winter wonderland.

My husband and I lived in Manhattan for years, and this morning in Reykjavik reminded us both of those rare occasions when it would snow in New York City and we would go out after the storm and have the normally teeming city streets all to ourselves, a rare serenity in a city of millions.

If you're considering a trip to Iceland in the winter but are wary of what the weather might be like, go! The average winter temperatures in Iceland are not much different than those in New York City, and the amazing perspective winter's ice and snowfall adds is well worth the chill.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Goodbye, Iceland

Flying out of Reykjavik, Iceland, in January after a wonderful five day trip, this was the last sight I saw before falling asleep - the inhospitable arctic landscape of Greenland. The third-largest country in North America and the world's largest island, Greenland is home to fewer than 58,000 people, despite its enormous size. The country's towns and villages all are located along the west coast, which is largely free of ice and more habitable.

Iceland in the winter is a sight to behold - I would recommend it to any traveler who likes a bit of adventure. As much as I love summer, it almost makes me wish for winter to come again so I can return. If you're flying out of Reykjavik on your way home, be sure to take a peek at Greenland. While stunning from the air, it's guaranteed to make you glad to live where you do!
over 4 years ago

A truly Icelandic weekend

The month I finally landed my new job, I called an old friend and said, "Let's do this." We'd both been talking about Iceland for years, and the travel posters all over New York were taunting me. When we landed, it was as if we'd touched down on the surface of the moon. The landscape outside Reykjavik looked alien with its grey-green moss, all the more alien in the arctic sunlight. We spent the weekend doing all the tourist things — city walking, puffin boat tours, and the (incredible) Blue Lagoon. But it wasn't until our last day when a local couple, long-time family friends of my fellow traveler, picked us up for a drive, that we really saw the country. Driving the southern coast will stick in my mind forever. Our hosts wanted to show us *their* Iceland. Glaciers, waterfalls, even stopping to say hello to Icelandic horses out to pasture. Best of all, we'd beat tourist season by a few weeks and every place we went was deserted. But the real surprise was our hosts had planned a hilltop picnic not far from the erupting Eyjafjallajökull. Afterwards, we drove straight to the airport to learn that our flight was the first to be allowed to take off all weekend — arriving back in the States a little tired, a little ashy, and grinning from ear to ear.
over 4 years ago

Get Your Kicks on Ring Road

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland in about 9 days this summer. We traveled the Ring Road, or Route 1, for most part with a few detours en route. Ring Road is the main road in the country that, as its name suggests, goes around the country. Most of the well-traveled tourist attractions are either on the road or close to it. The road is paved for most part and there are some graveled parts too but since we traveled in summer, it wasn't a major concern. We rented a small car (AVEO) (vs. a 4*4) as we were on a modest budget but did take gravel protection insurance while renting to be on the safer side. We had such a good time, that we think Icelanders should write songs about the road a la Route 66, if they haven't already!
over 4 years ago

Have you buckled up?

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland in about 9 days this summer. We traveled the Ring Road or Route 1 for most part with a few detours en route. We spotted this sign not too far from the capital city of Reykjavik on the Ring Road that apparently reads, "5 have died this year. Have you buckled up?." They , I assume, update the number each time there's a fatal accident on the road in the country.
over 4 years ago

The unrestrained color palette of Reykjavik

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland (on Ring Road) over a 9-day trip this summer. We spent 2 days in Reykjavik which I am told is the northernmost capital city in the world. The sheer vibrancy of the city blew us away.It felt so good to breathe in the clean, cold air of this gorgeous, sometimes-quirky-always-fun city, which couldn't have felt more alive if it tried.
over 4 years ago

A city fueled by caffeine and music

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland (on Ring Road) over a 9-day trip this summer. We spent 2 days in Reykjavik which I am told is the northernmost capital city in the world. The sheer vibrancy of the city blew us away. It's a city fueled by caffeine and music. These were shot at different places on their main shopping drag, Laugavegur street which has plenty of cafes
(that turn into bars by night), restaurants,nightclubs, music and book stores, gift shops, and boutiques etc. A little trivia for you: Bad Taste (known as Smekkleysa in Icelandic) is one of Iceland’s most important record labels and is most popularly known for being home to The Sugarcubes.
over 4 years ago

The colorful capital of Iceland

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland (on Ring Road) over a 9-day trip this summer. We spent 2 days in Reykjavik which I am told is the northernmost capital city in the world. The sheer vibrancy of the city blew us away.It felt so good to breathe in the clean, cold air of this gorgeous, sometimes-quirky-always-fun city, which couldn't have felt more alive if it tried. These were shot at different places on their main shopping drag, Laugavegur street which has plenty of cafes
(that turn into bars by night), restaurants,nightclubs, music and book stores, gift shops, and boutiques etc.
over 4 years ago

Lost in colors? :)

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland (on Ring Road) over a 9-day trip this summer. We spent 2 days in Reykjavik which I am told is the northernmost capital city in the world. The sheer vibrancy of the city blew us away.It felt so good to breathe in the clean, cold air of this gorgeous, sometimes-quirky-always-fun city, which couldn't have felt more alive if it tried.
over 4 years ago

Harpa at sunrise

My husband and I traveled around the periphery of Iceland (on Ring Road) over a 9-day trip this summer. We spent 2 days in Reykjavik which I am told is the northernmost capital city in the world. The sheer vibrancy of the city blew us away.It felt so good to breathe in the clean, cold air of this gorgeous, sometimes-quirky-always-fun city, which couldn't have felt more alive if it tried. This shot of Harpa, the concert hall by the harbor, was shot around sunrise. The city felt like it never sleeps in summer.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago
Reykjavik:  A Winter Wonderland

Reykjavik: A Winter Wonderland

My husband and I visited Iceland in January, ending our trip with a day in the quirky, artsy town of Reykjavik. To me, winter is the perfect time to visit Iceland - especially if you like photography - as the soft light and long sunsets make for jaw-dropping scenery.

If you're going to drive yourself around Iceland in the winter months like we did, just make sure you're really comfortable driving on ice. If so, the freedom of having a car and being on your own schedule is so rewarding.
over 4 years ago

Harmonic Harpa

Reykiavik, ICELAND -- While visiting Iceland, I discovered a few fun facts: They don’t have an army. I can barely pronounce any of the names of the cities, towns or volcanoes, but I love the food. The police around here are widely known to drive folks home if they get too drunk rather than jail them. Really.
But the talk of the town: Harpa, a world-class facility that is beautiful inside and out.
Costing roughly £150 million, Harpa was designed by the award-winning architectural team Henning Larsen Architects in collaboration with renowned artist Ólafur Eliasson. The structure is the new home to the Iceland Symphony Orchestra and the Icelandic Opera (previously resigned to playing in various movie theaters, but now comfortably ensconced in the new facility) -- and the venue is already esteemed in elite circles. The facade -- a dazzling display of multi-angled quasi-bricks with colored LED strips that can be easily brightened and dimmed, and will glow at night -- is stunning just like the interiors. I'm attracted to the energy and the beauty this place has to offer visitors. And I can't wait for my next visit back to Harpa because the concert I wanted to attend was sold out so I took this picture ( see above) instead. And here is another fun fact about Iceland: Be sure to purchase your Harpa concert tickets asap.
over 4 years ago

Reykjavik Graffiti I

Edgy and fun Reykjavik in the early spring (or late winter) is perfect for a long weekend. The city has great places to eat, is visually engaging and you can walk on a glacier, swim in a hot spring and see the Northern Lights (if you are lucky).
over 4 years ago

Enjoying a Dinner of Svið

Svið is a traditional Icelandic meal. Boiled sheep's head. Unfortunately, many of the traditional foods have gone by the wayside as tourists flood into Iceland, bringing their own cultural tastes. Ironically, the only place in which I was able to taste this odd dish was in a bus station cafeteria in Reykjavík. While not enjoyable in the least bit, the fact that I was eating meat off of a sheep's head was rather fascinating to me, and I could not resist trying to play with it. The most difficult part was stomaching the eyeball, especially as it slid across my tongue and down my throat. While an utterly disgusting thought, I took pride in the fact that I did it. I ate the sheep's head, and there were no traces of meat left on the skull. I'm glad that I could cross that off my list, and even more glad that I never would have to do that again!
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Steaming Hot Mud Pots on a Frigid Winter's Day in Iceland

My husband and I visited Iceland in January, renting a car to have the freedom to wander on our own schedule. Just outside Reykjavik, we came upon an area called Seltun that's known for its geothermal activity. Seltun was dotted with steaming vents and bubbling mud pots, the air thick with sulfur that smelled like rotten eggs. Water and mud boiled in exposed pools like this one, leaving behind colorful mineral deposits and formations. Being January in Iceland, the area was covered in ice and snow but these mud pots were boiling hot, a welcome respite from the freezing air.

During my time in Iceland, one of the things that impressed me most was the country's many striking contrasts: light and dark, soft and hard, or, in this case, steaming hot mud on a freezing cold winter's day.

If you're looking for a fun day trip while you're in Reykjavik, I highly suggest taking the hour or so drive to Seltun to check out the area's one-of-a-kind geothermal activity.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

The Impressive But Not-Easy-To-Pronounce Valahnjukur Rock Formations

If you're visiting Reykjavik, Iceland, one of the best day trips from the city is an easy drive to the Reykjanes peninsula to see the amazing rock formations rising out of the ocean at Valahnjukur. We visited Valahnjukur on a blustery January day, but the drama created by the soft, white snow covering the dark, hard rock formations made it worth the effort. Both the frigid air and the stunning view took your breath away.

If you're visiting the Valahnjukur rock formations, you should also stop to see the nearby Gardskagi lighthouse, which towers an imposing 90 feet above the sea. In fact, it's Iceland's tallest lighthouse, and recently Icelanders voted it their second-favorite in the whole country. The Gardskagi lighthouse also has the distinction of sitting next to one of the few white-sand beaches in Iceland; most of the country's beaches are composed of black volcanic sand.

The area surrounding the Valahnjukur rock formations and the Gardskagi lighthouse is a wonderful place to enjoy a picnic in the summer, and there's even a campground nearby for those looking to get a bit closer to nature. Definitely an easy and worthwhile day trip from Reykjavik.
over 4 years ago

Hunt for Street Art in Reykjavic

Fish play a big role in Iceland's culture. Restaurants and grocery stores offer dozens of species. The country's coins are adorned with fish. Iceland and the United Kingdom have had more than one confrontation over fishing rights in the North Atlantic (known as the Cod Wars). So it makes sense that fish would also appear in art...in this case, a fabulous mural on the side of a building in Reykjavic (and my new computer desktop image). Stroll around the city if the weather permits and see what whimsical surprises await you. You'll find lots of amazing street art in this northern city.
over 4 years ago

Skógafoss Waterfall

The most incredible waterfall ....made of ice and surrounded by ice. We slide out to it on our back sides like children because the ground was .. you guessed it.. ice. The most beautiful site!
over 4 years ago

Reykjavik Graffiti

Covered walls off Hverfisgata. Reykjavik, Iceland.
over 4 years ago

Feeding the Birds at Tjörnin

Near City Hall (Ráðhúsið), is a large pond, where, even when mostly frozen, has an open area where waterfowl of all types gather. The area attracts, at different seasons, 40+ species of water birds, including Arctic terns, Eider ducks, Gadwalls, geese, Mallards, gulls, scaup, and (my favorites) whooper swans. From early morning until dusk, crowds carrying bags of bread and bird food gather to feed them. When frozen, the lake is a playground for locals, who congregate with their skates and sleds or just slide around on their boots for fun.