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Manu National Park

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Manu Manu  Peru
Manu Extreme Biodiversity Manu  Peru
Trekking in the Manu along the Alto Madre de Dios Manu  Peru
Manu Manu  Peru
Manu Extreme Biodiversity Manu  Peru
Trekking in the Manu along the Alto Madre de Dios Manu  Peru
Manu
When thinking about the Amazon Jungle, Brazil may first come to mind—and rightly so, as the largest portion of the rain forest is indeed in that country. However, the Amazon also makes up 60 percent of Peru’s land. Experience this fantastic landscape at Manu National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Biosphere Reserve. Try to spend a minimum of five days in the park, keeping in mind that the farther into the jungle you go, the more likely you are to see a wide variety of wildlife. Given that the park encompasses microclimates that range from more than 13,000 feet above sea level down to 984 feet, you will find a great diversity of vegetation, birds (800 species), and mammals (200 species) here. Not to mention butterflies—an incredible 1,300 butterfly species live in the jungle.
Manu Extreme Biodiversity
Are you a Nature tourist? Do you fancy traveling to Rainforests or places where you can communicate with nature? Tierras Vivas Travel Agency invites you to explore the wonders the Manu has to offer. Take the time to relax and read this important information which can help you decide which Manu tour to choose to have the greatest adventure of your life. Peru has lots of amazing places and its jungle is no exception. Manu National Park is a World Heritage Site it is one of the areas with greater diversity of the planet. (https://www.tierrasvivas.com/en/manu-park-iosphere)
Manu Extreme Biodiversity Manu  Peru

Trekking in the Manu along the Alto Madre de Dios
Traveling down the Alto Madre de Dios River through the Manu Valley jungle, thunder rolling in the distance, we stopped to trek along the perimeter of an Oxbow lake, sighting the pre-historic looking Hoatzin (aka Stink Bird), with small claws on the bend of each wing, spiky yellow and red head crested punkish-looking feathers that overshadow its small head, a blue face, maroon eyes, a couple of feet in length, with a hoarse and unmelodic call, some of them engaging in suggestive activity atop tree branches across the lake. We encountered Bullet ants, one inch long, whose bites can induce a 24 hour fever and were were followed by a caiman, whose head barely broke the lake’s surface, eyes on us, his broad menacing head staring at us, gliding alongside us. At 4:15 a.m. one morning. we boated downriver to the Trocha Gaucamayo Macaw Lick and its blind, allowing for viewing of the squawking Scarlet Macaws and the more cheerful, but still loud, chirping of the green feathered Orange-Cheeked Parakeets and the brilliant green Mealy Amazon Parrots, all of them digging their bills into the clay to gather sodium not available in their normal diet. A later visit at night to a tapir lick proved unsuccessful due to a torrential downpour, dissuading the tapirs from showing up. The highlight of another Oxbow lake was Piranha fishing from a simple, open, wooden raft afloat with pontoons, sporting benches for our benefit and oared by two locals. Several of us caught and released a number of these sharp-toothed fish. However, we failed to see the elusive Giant Otter, only 250 left in all of Peru, down from 40,000 60 years ago. A grand time in all!
Trekking in the Manu along the Alto Madre de Dios Manu  Peru