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Ke’anae Peninsula

Keanae Rd, Hawaii 96708, USA
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Ke’anae Peninsula Maui County Hawaii United States
Splash! Maui County Hawaii United States
Lava Rock Peninsula Maui County Hawaii United States
Ke’anae Peninsula Maui County Hawaii United States
Splash! Maui County Hawaii United States
Lava Rock Peninsula Maui County Hawaii United States

Ke’anae Peninsula

The world-famous Road to Hana hugs a jagged black lava shore. Past mile marker 16, turn left and explore a traditional village and 1856 stone church, all girdled by taro fields. Centuries ago, Hawaiians carried this soil down—basket by basket—to soften the landscape of young rock, created by a massive flow from Haleakalā. The lush greenery makes for an impressive sight again the sapphire sea and Maui’s famous North Shore waves: photographers should pack plenty of memory cards! Ke’anae also attracts fishermen and foodies, who shouldn’t miss Aunt Sandy's, one of the best banana bread stands along the Hana Highway (210 Keanae Rd). Stop for a slice and a shave ice—or a pork sandwich if you’re hungrier!

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AFAR Contributor
about 5 years ago

Splash!

The Road to Hana hugs tons of brilliant, jagged black lava shore. Around mile 16, pull of the road to explore the Keanae Peninsula. Thee're an old Hawaiian village, taro patches, and a church that dates back to the 1850s. I love watching the waves crash against the lava pinacles - the contrast of the jet black stone against the turquoise water is just brilliant. Keanae is also home to Aunt Sandy's, one of the best banana bread stands along the Hana Highway (you'll see them about every half mile). Make sure you pick up a slice for the rest of the ride.
AFAR Contributor
about 5 years ago

Lava Rock Peninsula

When the Haleakala Crater erupted hundreds of years ago, it created this lava rock peninsula a half mile past mile marker 16. Make a detour to visit the old Hawaiian village of Keanae, where you can watch locals harvest taro and pound it into the traditional dish poi. This appeared in the January/February 2014 issue.