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Hotel Café Royal

10 Air Street
| +44 20 7406 3333
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Hotel Café Royal London  United Kingdom
Hotel Café Royal London  United Kingdom
Lattes & Cake at “The Café” at Café Royal London  United Kingdom
Hotel Café Royal London  United Kingdom
Hotel Café Royal London  United Kingdom
Lattes & Cake at “The Café” at Café Royal London  United Kingdom

Hotel Café Royal

Opened in 1865 as a restaurant, event space, and wine store, Café Royal quickly became a gathering spot for London’s intelligentsia and glitterati. Over the following 150 years, everyone from Winston Churchill and Oscar Wilde to Muhammed Ali and David Bowie was spotted here swapping stories and hosting celebrations. Re-launched in 2012 as a hotel, Café Royal continues to serve as a vibrant hub for guests, thanks to its central location between Mayfair and Soho, a short walk from theaters, shops, and tourist attractions.  

Past a stunning lobby (which recently underwent a $6.6 million re-design), the 160 rooms and suites are warm and streamlined, crafted with materials like Carrera marble, English oak, and Portland stone, and outfitted with Bang & Olufsen entertainment systems, sound proofing, rainfall showers, luxury linens, and free Wi-Fi. All rooms come with perks like complimentary John Lobb shoe shines, while the seven super-luxe Signature Suites feature things like Tudor fireplaces, deep-soaking tubs, private screening rooms, dining areas, and butler service. In keeping with the building’s gourmet history, dining and drinking options include the Laurent at Café Royal grill and sushi bar from celebrated chef Laurent Tourondel; the gilded Oscar Wilde Lounge for traditional afternoon tea service; the bright and modern Papillon for all-day dining with British-French flavors; and Green Bar for botanical-based cocktails and fine liquors. Launched in 2018 inside the Laurent restaurant, Ziggy’s bar serves expertly crafted drinks in a space that pays homage to the late David Bowie, who held a “retirement party” for his Ziggy Stardust alter-ego at the Café Royal in 1970. A spacious gym (with LifeFitness equipment, class studios, and a 60-foot lap pool) and the Akasha Spa (with sauna, hammam, and nine rooms for East-meets-West treatments) round out the facilities.

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AFAR Contributor
over 4 years ago

Hotel Café Royal

In December 2012, Regent Street’s famous 19th-century restaurant and bar reopened in all of its extravagant, Louis XVI−style glory as a luxury hotel. The heart of London’s social scene for nearly 150 years, Café Royal was a hangout for Virginia Woolf, Mick Jagger, and David Bowie. Today, the café’s Grill Room has been reconceived as a champagne and caviar lounge. Bartenders drip absinthe from a traditional fountain and mix it in cocktails such as the Piccadilly (Lillet Blanc, absinthe, gin, grenadine, and sugar). The hotel’s public spaces feature gilded wood paneling and other historic details while the guest rooms are the epitome of modern.
AFAR Staff
over 4 years ago

Lattes & Cake at “The Café” at Café Royal

Walking in front of The Café will make you stop—the window fronts are filled with cakes and sweets that make you immediately want to enter for a dessert and coffee, which is what I did. You really did feel like you were royalty sitting at the marble tables and looking out on the streets of London. The latte was one of the best I had had and the cake was superb—it was just the right amount of sweetness to compliment the latte. Plus, it was fun to see how it crumbled with the special knife/fork they gave you to eat it.
The Set Hotels
about 3 years ago

Hotel Café Royal

Café Royal, and the other Set Hotels, celebrate the seven arts, among them architecture. The precise restoration and refurbishment of the hotel by David Chipperfield is an architectural delight, and right outside the hotel’s front door is another. The Café Royal is located on Regent Street, a grand achievement of urban design by John Nash. Constructed between 1814 and 1825, the street cut a path through the warren of medieval streets typical of London and connected the city center with the then new Regent’s Park. While only one of John Nash’s buildings still stands, the street remains an impressive feat of urban planning and lined with later, but still listed, buildings.