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Castillo de San Cristóbal

San Francisco, San Juan, 00901, Puerto Rico
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Storming the Castle San Juan  Puerto Rico
Snowed In With Plenty To Do San Juan  Puerto Rico
Climbing the Ramparts of an Old Fortress San Juan  Puerto Rico
Stand in a Piece of History  San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Fort San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Storming the Castle San Juan  Puerto Rico
Snowed In With Plenty To Do San Juan  Puerto Rico
Climbing the Ramparts of an Old Fortress San Juan  Puerto Rico
Stand in a Piece of History  San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Castillo de San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico
Fort San Cristóbal San Juan  Puerto Rico

Storming the Castle

The Castillo de San Cristóbal is a Spanish fort in San Juan. Built by Spain to protect against land-based attacks, it is now part of the San Juan National Historic Site.

More Recommendations

over 4 years ago

Snowed In With Plenty To Do

After a week in Fajardo, I wound up stranded in Old San Juan (and later St. Thomas) for a few days while airports were shut down in Boston due to massive snows. The city is clean, safe, and affordable with plenty to see and do. There is captivating architecture, intriguing history, as well as great food and nightlife. I wish I could get snowed-in at places like this more often.
AFAR Local Expert
over 4 years ago

Climbing the Ramparts of an Old Fortress

Climb the ramparts and stroll the grounds at San Cristobal Castle, the largest fortification built by the Spanish in the New World. Built to protect against land-based attacks on San Juan, it covered 27 acres when it was finished in 1783.

Visitors who prefer a tour with commentary can book a guide, but I would recommend wandering around the fortress and stopping occasionally to read information posted throughout and take in dusty exhibits on the history of the fort and of San Juan.

A small gift shop offers cookbooks, leather goods stamped with images of the fort, and coquis (Puerto Rico's famous tree frogs), as well as postcards, T-shirts, and bottles of water.

If you also plan on visiting El Morro, save a buck and buy a ticket to both fortresses (valid for 7 days including the day of purchase).

On a side note, wear sunscreen or cover up. I don't normally burn, but I came away from the few hours I spent at the fortress with the back of my hands quite red. Apparently, Puerto Rico is too close to the Equator to do without UVA protection.
over 4 years ago

Stand in a Piece of History

Castillo de San Cristóbal in old San Juan: Don't miss the opportunity to visit a piece of history standing over 500 years. Walk, marvel, inhale, and continue... Repeat...
almost 3 years ago

Castillo de San Cristóbal

Construction on El Castillo de San Cristóbal began in 1634 and it is the largest fort built by the Spanish in the New World! It was built to protect San Juan from enemy attacks by land, and climbing through the fort is quite a rewarding experience. The views from the top of the fort are spectacular, while cannon openings and barred windows offer beautifully framed views of San Juan.
AFAR Local Expert
about 2 years ago

Fort San Cristóbal

While El Morro protected San Juan from attacks by sea, Fort San Cristóbal was built to protect the city from land attacks. Its construction started in 1634, after the Dutch successfully—though briefly—took the city by land. By the late 1700s, San Cristóbal had become massive, with walls that encompassed the old city. As part of the San Juan National Historic Site, Fort San Cristóbal is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a U.S. National Historic Site. Visitors can explore the tunnels and dungeon, walk the walls with their garitas (sentry boxes) and see the Santa Barbara chapel.