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Getting Around Bangkok

Bangkok Yai, Bangkok, จังหวัด กรุงเทพมหานคร 10600, Thailand
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Tuk-Tuks, Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Transportation Around Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Canals Bangkok  Thailand
Midnight Tuk-Tuk Ride Bangkok  Thailand
Crossing From Thailand To Cambodia Bangkok  Thailand
Temple Hopping in Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Temple Trailing in Tuc-tuc Hell Bangkok  Thailand
Tuk tuk!  Bangkok  Thailand
Thailand Travel Tips - Train, Bus, Or Fly Bangkok  Thailand
Cruise the City Streets in a Tuk-Tuk Bangkok  Thailand
Festivities & Fun on an Overnight Train to Bangkok  Bangkok  Thailand
Bamboozled in Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Tuk-Tuk Adventures in Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Tuk-Tuks, Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Transportation Around Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Canals Bangkok  Thailand
Midnight Tuk-Tuk Ride Bangkok  Thailand
Crossing From Thailand To Cambodia Bangkok  Thailand
Temple Hopping in Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Temple Trailing in Tuc-tuc Hell Bangkok  Thailand
Tuk tuk!  Bangkok  Thailand
Thailand Travel Tips - Train, Bus, Or Fly Bangkok  Thailand
Cruise the City Streets in a Tuk-Tuk Bangkok  Thailand
Festivities & Fun on an Overnight Train to Bangkok  Bangkok  Thailand
Bamboozled in Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand
Tuk-Tuk Adventures in Bangkok Bangkok  Thailand

Tuk-Tuks, Bangkok

Hailing a taxi or tuk-tuk may not work if you signal with your palm up. Instead, hold your arm out with your palm facing down and move it like you’re slowly bouncing a basketball. When you catch a taxi, make sure the meter is turned on to avoid being overcharged. Your best bet is to flag down a cab that’s on the move.

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over 5 years ago

Transportation Around Bangkok

It seems that one of the major differences between living a place and visiting is the experience of transportation. Living in New York as long as I have, taking the subway is just a part of my day. Rarely memorable and never a goal in and of itself. But for a visitor, it is a great way to get the feel of the rhythm of the city. In Thailand, I decided to experience every form of public transportation I could: local buses, buses between cities, trains, subways, water taxis, metered taxis, tuk-tuks and motorcycle taxis. While riding on the back of a motorcycle and weaving through Bangkok traffic was certainly the most exciting, I highly recommend riding the Skytrain. By getting slightly above street level, it is possible to get a whole new view of the city.
over 5 years ago

Canals

There are several natural canals throughout a city that is littered with skyscrapers. The people living here have done so for generations. Children can be seen playing in the water.
Anonymous User
over 5 years ago

Midnight Tuk-Tuk Ride

After a delicious meal in Chinatown recommended by Anthony Bourdain (No Reservations anyone?) we hopped on one of the more elaborate tuk-tuk's and made our way back to the hotel. It's an awesome experience to watch Bangkok's nightlife as you speed away from one of Thailand's popular mode of transportation!
over 5 years ago

Crossing From Thailand To Cambodia

Are we there yet? Most travelers going from Thailand to Cambodia take the bus. Unknown to many is the local train, which will take you from Bangkok all the way to the Poipet, Cambodia border. See the Thai countryside, interact with locals, eat fresh food from train vendors (fried rice with an egg, green mango slices with chili) and reach your destination for under $2. It's a five hour ride that will let you feel like a local.
over 5 years ago

Temple Hopping in Bangkok

Outside, the evening was hot and heavy, but my taxi was cold and very, very fast. I kept noticing speed signs that read ‘60’, which my driver was very successfully ignoring, driving in the fast lane over a hundred and up the arses of the cars in front. It wasn’t exactly as if I was in a hurry. Around the speeding car grew this enormous sparkling city that was sitting down in the last lick of light from the setting sun, behind which the night followed in shades of deepest blue. The night was becoming panoramic. A million people were out on the Silom Road. I decided to take the water bus on the Chao Phraya river. Four hours later I had still not seen the Grand Palace, but, thanks to a crazy tuc-tuc driver who wouldn't let me go I had got a chance to visit two jewelry bazaars, two tailors and a tourist agency. In between fulfilling his quota with his ‘sponsors’, my tuc-tuc driver, whose name I never got, did manage to take me to two amazing places, the first of which was Wat Saket ‘The Golden Mount’. An artificial hill constructed under King Rama III (1824-51) the Golden Mount was a burial site during the plague under his reign, and thirty thousand people were cremated here.
over 5 years ago

Temple Trailing in Tuc-tuc Hell

Bangkok, in search of temples. Outside the Grand Palace I met the person who turned out to be my host for the next four hours, a tuc-tuc driver who told me his first lie of the day, that the Grande Palace was not open until 12.30, but in the meantime he could take me to a few places (nudge nudge, wink wink, say no more). I readily agreed, looking forward to my first trip on one of these colourful converted motorbikes that are everywhere in Bangkok. Four hours later I had still not seen the Grand Palace, but I had the opportunity to visit two jewelry bazaars, two tailors and a tourist agency, fulfilling the tuc-tuc drivers quota for the day. I was so glad to have made him happy…
over 5 years ago

Tuk tuk!

Yes they are a rip off, and yes they try to take you to places where they will receive a commission if you buy a silk suit. BUT - they are also really fun. If you can handle the exhaust fumes, which are pretty much unavoidable anyway in downtown BKK, riding around in a tuk tuk is a fun way to travel between some of the major sites. One time is probably all you will need!
almost 3 years ago

Thailand Travel Tips - Train, Bus, Or Fly

Getting between cities in Thailand can be very simple. Most people take airplanes, and most tourist cities have airports. Flying in you'll probably have to transfer in Bangkok, then it will be followed by a short flight to your final destination. Flying is quick, however it's pricier than other options and you'll miss out on seeing some of the country side. Travelling by bus and train can be much more affordable, and if you take night trains or buses you'll save a night in a hotel. The ride from Bangkok to Phuket or Chaingmai could take as much as 10 to 12 hours. Both the buses and trains offer several class levels, the 1st and 2nd class trains and buses will offer air conditioning, beds in overnight rides, and snacks, drinks, and meals. In all cases alcohol is not permitted on the vehicles. The advantage of travelling at night is that you have a place to sleep and you'll arrive early to your destination. The disadvantage comes to anyone over 5 foot 6 (due to the size of the reclining seats on the vehicles). Daytime travel while taking more out of your travel time gives you the opportunity to see the country a little more.
Korean Air
over 5 years ago

Cruise the City Streets in a Tuk-Tuk

A ride in a three-wheeled tuk-tuk is an essential experience for visitors to Bangkok. One part rickshaw, one part motor trike, these iconic vehicles were imported from Japan after World War II and named for the puttering sound of their two-cylinder engines. In the early morning, you’ll see them transporting produce to markets around the city, but they are available for hire at all hours. Ride like a local: Negotiate the fare with the driver before your journey.
The Ritz-Carlton
over 5 years ago

Festivities & Fun on an Overnight Train to Bangkok

After a month cycling through Laos my brother and I took this train ride across Thailand to catch our flights home out of Bangkok. It wound up being one of the most memorable trips I’ve taken. The well-worn train cars were all packed with festive travelers, locals, and plenty of food vendors who boarded and walked through the aisles at every stop. After most passengers retired to their sleeper cars, we shared libations and many laughs with the train officers, who were eager to hear of our travels and share their jars of Lao Lao. When I look back on that trip I feel like I took part in a Wes Anderson film. (photo: Kuruman/Flickr Creative Commons)
over 3 years ago

Bamboozled in Bangkok

It all seems so easy and fun to flag down a tuk-tuk on a Bangkok street to zip around and see the sights. Our friendly English-speaking driver smiled as we piled into the back and asked him to take us to Wat Po. As we followed along on our street map, we realized that we were not moving in the right direction. "Are we there yet?" "Well, actually", he explained to us, there is a special ceremony at Wat Po for the next hour, so he was taking us to an expo center where we could view some cultural exhibits. Shorthand for a souvenir store whose owner pays him to deliver unsuspecting tourists to visit the shop. There was no "special ceremony" interrupting Wat Po's visiting hours. Just a simple scam by the tuk-tuk driver in cahoots with the shop owner. After a different driver tried the same story later that day, we became wise to the ruse. We had snapped this photo of ourselves early on, while we were still blissfully unaware of the bamboozle.
over 3 years ago

Tuk-Tuk Adventures in Bangkok

Riding around in a tuk-tuk in Bangkok outside of Wat Pho (Pho Temple) which was near the Arun Residence where we were staying. Tuk-Tuk's are an incredibly iconic experience that I highly recommend if you've never been to Bangkok but a word of caution: They are pretty much all part of an intricately and skillfully organized racket. The tuk-tuk drivers (or touts who are incognito) will lure you into taking a trip to see all of the temples starting at around 20 baht (less than $1 US). It sounds great but the way that the drivers really get paid is a type of commission deal where they are allied with a network of jewelry and tailor shops that pay them to bring traffic to their stores. Once you are in the tuk-tuk, the driver (who is often genuinely friendly--a classic Thai trait) will offer his own temple circuit itinerary to you. Inevitably, the conversation will turn to shopping and he'll suggest some "great" shopping location. Where it gets really interesting is at the temples. You'll quite likely "bump into" a local who is there to pay his respects who will very innocently reveal confidential insider info on a government shop that just happens to be open to the public for that day meaning you have access to their wholesale prices. That being said, if you are aware of the scam, riding a tuk-tuk is actually a really fun way to see Bangkok. You might let the driver know you're in the know & negotiate just stopping briefly at one of the shops (that usually suffices).
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