Photos page thumb 709042fba4b6ccb2fa785c24b9d6f88c?1383773477

Patrick Bennett

AFAR Ambassador

AFAR Ambassadors are in-the-know bloggers who have a passion for experiential travel.

New York, New York, United States

www.uncommoncaribbean.com

Plane loaderAnimated dots

Basseterre
Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Basseterre, Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Sidecar’s Hideout
You won’t find Sidecar’s Hideout in any tourist guide. You won’t find it on any cruise ship itineraries. You won’t find it on any blogger’s top ten things to do on St. Kitts list, either. In fact, chances are you won’t find Sidecar’s Hideout at all. And that’s part of the reason I love it. The requisite Soca music blares from a pile of speakers rattling the entire makeshift structure—just mismatched wood haphazardly nailed together and topped with an aging collection of tarps. The “bar” is made of wood planks covered over with slightly worn felt. The drinks come out of old coolers. Dogs roam idly about, as do some regulars talking loudly over the music and knocking back Carib beers. What more could you want from a roadside rum shack? Food and drinks, you say? Well, I can tell you Mr. Sidecar himself (ask him how he got that nickname for a fun story) served me some killer goat water (a thin brown soup with a random sampling of goat parts) and a plastic cup of hammond (an illicit rum made in small pot stills back in the bushes of St. Kitts). This combo is sure to put some bite in your bark.
Sidecar’s Hideout
1 experience, added to 1 List

Basseterre
Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Basseterre, Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Ital Creations at Fari Organic Farm
Mr. Juda of Ital Creations at Fari Organic Farm (and a contributor to Belle Mont Farm’s organic efforts) has the cure for whatever ails you! Your best bet is to start with his selection of moringa juices—a plant grown in the area. There’s ginger, “original”, sorrel, and, my favorite, unsweetened. Many consider the moringa a “miracle tree” with its high levels of Vitamins C, A, calcium, potassium, and iron. But the incredibly healthy Ital creations don’t end there. On a recent visit this was the lunch menu: Fire Roasted Breadfruit Topped with Lentils in Greens Sauce. And when they say, “fire roasted”, they mean cooked traditionally in a little fire pit behind the counter.
Ital Creations at Fari Organic Farm
1 experience, added to 1 List

Basseterre
Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Basseterre, Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis
OJ’s Ital Cart
Vitality. Spirit. Energy. Livity. Whatever you call it, we all want more of it. While much of Western society has embraced processed protein powders, ultra-caffeinated beverages, and other scientific wonders, the Rastafarian lifestyle and culture provides a different approach best sampled in Basseterre at OJ’s Ital Cart. What’s ital food? The approach is food that is fresh, natural, and from the earth. The ingredients never include chemical pesticides or fertilizers—they don’t even use salt with iodine. At OJ’s you can experience quality ital cooking from a brightly painted, old food truck with permanently flattened tires and a line that often wraps around the block at lunchtime. The vibe is fast and fun. (So don’t fault them for cooking their food in metal pots and serving it in styrofoam! Both no-no’s in strict ital quarters.) If you’re looking for great street food on St. Kitts, a visit to OJ’s Ital is vital. Eat Good. Live Long.
OJ’s Ital Cart
1 experience, added to 1 List

Caribelle Batik at Romney Manor
Old Road Town, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Caribelle Batik at Romney Manor, Old Road Town, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Caribelle Batik
I don’t know how batik came to the West Indies all the way from Indonesia, but just like the introduced coconut palm (yes, that came from Asia, too) the ancient art of wax-resist dyeing is deeply rooted in the Caribbean. Growing up, many kids (me included) learned batik in grade school. And walking around St. Kitts it’s not uncommon to glimpse brightly colored and intricately designed pieces on locals and visitors alike. They can be whimsical or simple and used to dress up or down any time of day. The best place to pick up one of these creations for yourself is Caribelle Batik at Romney Manor. There you can watch as artists take you through the steps of applying wax, dyeing, and boiling hue after colorful hue. Then explore their wide selection of wraps, dresses, beach tops, bandanas, wall hangings, bags, kaftans, and men’s dress shirts for just the right piece. As a bonus, the five acres of botanical gardens that make up Romney Manor happen to have once been home to Sam Jefferson II, great, great, great grandfather of Thomas Jefferson. But get there early to beat the rush—this is a stop for some of the cruise crowd.
Caribelle Batik
1 experience, added to 1 List

Brimstone Hill
Saint Anne Sandy Point Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Brimstone Hill, Saint Anne Sandy Point Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Brimstone Hill
On the west coast of St. Kitts looms one of the most impressive sites in all the Caribbean: a towering black rock nearly a thousand feet tall, crowned with an equally black massive fortress growing straight out of the top. This is Brimstone Hill. Formerly a British military site, the black stone blocks that make up the fortress were cut right from the volcanic andesite of the pillar. The mortar was made directly from the soft limestone onsite—boiled in massive limekilns. Construction took more than 100 years, from the 1690s to 1790s. Today, Brimstone Hill has been well restored as a UNESCO World Heritage Site of historical, cultural, and architectural significance—with cannons once again facing out over Sandy Point and the Caribbean. Be sure to visit the Fort George Museum for information on the storied history of the site and what life was like for the fort’s inhabitants throughout the ages.
Brimstone Hill
1 experience, added to 1 List

Belle Mont Farm
Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Belle Mont Farm, Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis
The Mill
The Mill at Belle Mont Farm is a sweet reminder of how St. Kitts came to be known as “Sugar City.” For centuries sugar was the most prized crop in the world and in the Caribbean St. Kitts was the king of cane. In fact, by 1775 there were 68 sugar estates on the island, or one for every square mile! And with sugar cane came windmills—picturesque icons of the island’s principal product. Today, the vast majority of those 18th century mills are crumbling ruins, so The Mill at Belle Mont Farm was built from scratch as homage to this vital part of St. Kitts’ history. In the cozy interior you’ll find a unique round bar that fits perfectly within the space. Above the bar, a round lighting system sets the mood while an assortment of old-time radios help transport guests to a sepia-toned, romantic past. It could be said that sugar cane is still processed at this modern mill. Now the sweet stuff takes the form of top shelf rums taken neat or in creative cocktails. And if rum isn’t your thing, Belle Mont Farm has a wide selection of organic wines, carefully curated by Isabelle Legeron, Master of Wine. Cheers! Image courtesy of Kittitian Hill.
The Mill
1 experience, added to 1 List

Belle Mont Farm
Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Belle Mont Farm, Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis
The Lookout
Belle Mont Farm rests high on the green foothills of Mount Liamuiga—a nearly four thousand foot tall dormant volcano that forms the western part of St. Kitts. The peak is not only the highest point on St. Kitts, it’s also one of the tallest points in the eastern Caribbean. Though Belle Mont Farm is less than half way up, sitting at about one thousand feet, it still commands a stunning view of northwestern St. Kitts. The best place to take it all in is at the appropriately named Lookout. In the foreground, tops of steeped cottages peek out of lush green. Next Irie Fields, the 18-hole golf course, sprawls down the hill. On its fringes rolling fields with small houses sprinkled around the edges extend toward the coast. From there, a silver sea lies between St. Kitts and the seductive silhouette of St. Eustatius. Lucky visitors to the Lookout early in the morning can often see a rainbow hanging over St. Eustatius, also called Statia. In the afternoon small clouds trail shadows across the countryside and sunsets paint the entire scene in a stunning array of warmth. There may be no better perch to take in St. Kitts.
The Lookout
1 experience, added to 1 List

Belle Mont Farm
Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Belle Mont Farm, Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Luxury Landscape
One of the highlights of Belle Mont Farm on Kittitian Hill is the farm, and luckily you don’t have to go searching for their bountiful garden. You see, Belle Mont Farm doesn’t just have a farm, it is a farm. An impressive array of fruits and vegetables fill the property including bananas, mangos, ginger, topi tambo (kind of like a small new potato), pineapples, lemongrass, papaya, sugar cane, pigeon peas, green figs, plums, citrus, melons, and more. Even the golf course, usually associated with manufactured greenery, is a fully organic, productive part of the farm. But unlike most farms, this one is strategically designed to be both prolific and aesthetically pleasing. Broad-leafed banana plants wrap outdoor bathrooms in seclusion. Sugar cane stands tall creating green walls between cottages. Prickly pineapple plants add low accents to entryways. Everywhere you go, lush green surrounds you in tropical beauty that belies its practicality. As produce ripens, it’s simply harvested from wherever it grows. Nothing is wasted. If the entire plant needs to be removed during harvesting, a replacement takes its place fresh from the on-property nursery. This type of sustainable and fruitful landscaping is no easy feat—the planning, care, timing, and management must be perfect. The benefit to guests is a luxury landscape like nowhere in the Caribbean… And, of course, a cornucopia of fresh organic produce in every meal.
Luxury Landscape
1 experience, added to 1 List

Belle Mont Farm
Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Belle Mont Farm, Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Breakfast at Belle Mont Farm
The best properties in the world come with amenities designed to surprise and delight their guests. In this regard, Belle Mont Farm easily succeeds. There’s a huge gym, a glorious pool, carefully curated art around every corner, and much more to savor. However, I’ve always believed that breakfast is the barometer against which all hotels should be measured. I don’t care how nice the place is, if the breakfast stinks, we have a problem. So how’s the breakfast at Belle Mont Farm? Delivered to my cottage by three lovely young ladies, I received homemade local jams, a selection of warm breads, a blend of fresh squeezed juices, plus a bowl of fresh carambola, pineapple, and melon. There was homemade West Indian pumpkin bread (also still warm) and yogurt. But what blew me away was an absolutely incredible frittata made with fresh produce from the farm including spinach, onions, eggplant, pumpkin, and basil all topped with goat cheese. In a word: heaven. It’s been said that “all happiness depends on a leisurely breakfast” and it would seem that the folks at Belle Mont Farm couldn’t agree more. Yum!
Breakfast at Belle Mont Farm
1 experience, added to 1 List

Belle Mont Farm
Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Belle Mont Farm, Saint Paul Capisterre Parish, Saint Kitts and Nevis
The Great House
The great houses of the West Indies played a central role in the region for hundreds of years. Although originally transplanted from Europe, the characteristics and architectural styling of these buildings were adapted to use native materials (local hardwoods like mahogany and indigenous stone like coral limestone) and to take advantage of persistent trade winds as a way to stay cool on hot tropical days. The Great House at Belle Mont Farm is a further appropriation of this classic West Indian architectural style—now updated with a pastoral elegance that’s the perfect backdrop to dining, drinks, and taking in the breathtaking beauty of the surrounding hillside. Designed by the award-winning architect Bill Bensley, who made a career of crafting some of the most luxurious spaces in the world, the Great House at Belle Mont Farm features three levels for relaxed dining. Executive Chef Christophe Letard oversees all dining at Kittitian Hill and creates menus for The Kitchen, located in The Great House, and other venues throughout the property. Like all of Belle Mont Farm, his inventive menus focus on local ingredients, and introduces diners to regional dishes. The first floor caters to dining (or simply drinking) accompanied by a spectacular view of the ocean. On the third and highest level a terrace dining area is set between the great house’s massive pillars. There’s a quieter space on the far side that offers diners a view of Mount Liamuiga’s misty heights. Great indeed.
The Great House
1 experience, added to 1 List

Robert L. Bradshaw International Airport
Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis

Robert L. Bradshaw International Airport, Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Yu Lounge
It’s been said that the world’s greatest luxury isn’t money, influence or even power—it’s time. There’s even a name for feeling like you have more than enough time: “time affluence.” This concept is something the new Yu Lounge provides in spades from the moment you land in St. Kitts for a stay at Belle Mont Farm on Kittitian Hill. When I touched down in St. Kitts a sun shower was threatening. Should I run to the terminal for fear of getting drenched? No need. The Yu Lounge already had a pristine Mercedes-Benz and driver waiting for me on the tarmac—umbrella at the ready. And that’s not only for inclement weather, all Yu Lounge guests receive this welcome. What comes next? Rushing through customs, hustling to get your luggage? Passing through the Yu Lounge things are different. After a brief drive from the tarmac to the lounge, I was greeted with a rum cocktail and a full lunch. The lounge itself encourages those arriving to linger with soothing lighting, speedy WiFi, and comfortable seats—all in a spacious, relaxing environment. While I sat back and enjoyed my time affluence, my arrival was processed through the lounge’s in-house immigration office, my luggage materialized as if by magic, and the rum tasted delicious. Did I mention there’s an outdoor deck complete with lounge chairs in the departures wing for a last taste of the Kittitian sun? At the Yu Lounge you can definitely expect a taste of time affluence… among many other types.
Yu Lounge
1 experience, added to 1 List

Fort James
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda

Fort James, Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
Travel Back to 1739 at Fort James
What must life have been like back in 1739. That was the year the foundation stones were laid for Fort James on the northern entrance to St. John's Harbour. Upon completion of the fort, it became customary for every vessel passing to pay a fee of 18 shillings to the captain of the fort or risk a shot being fired across its bow! With 10 cannons capable of firing 24 lb balls for over a mile on the ramparts, as you can imagine, ships generally paid the fee. Today, Fort James still sports its signature cannons pointing menacingly out into the harbour. Most of the other structures within the fort though, have crumbled. In their place, at least on the north side of the fort, is a quaint restaurant: Russels. There you can cap off your trip back in time with "old-fashioned rum punches", fresh fish, peas and rice, and other traditional fare... Something like they must have eaten back in 1739.
Travel Back to 1739 at Fort James
1 experience, added to 1 List

Fort Barrington National Park
Saint John, Antigua and Barbuda

Fort Barrington National Park, Saint John, Antigua and Barbuda
Fight for Your Right at Fort Barrington
You see it while dodging massive potholes on the dirt road just a bit past the entrance to Coconut Beach Club; looming atop Goat Hill. Fort Barrington was one of the first lines of defense for St. John's reporting ship movements to nearby Rat Island via flag and light signals. While just a lookout station, being on the front lines wasn't easy. Fort Barrington likely saw the most action of any fort on Antigua, being captured and liberated from the French going back as far as 1652. The fort as it stands today was built in 1779 and is one of the best ruins to explore. Not only does its position atop Goat Hill provide a short but invigorating climb, there are also several rooms to explore, and the view from the top is unmatched for its sea view — blue stretches for miles.
Fight for Your Right at Fort Barrington
1 experience, added to 1 List

Fort Berkeley
Saint Paul, Antigua and Barbuda

Fort Berkeley, Saint Paul, Antigua and Barbuda
See Nelson's Dockyard from a Whole New Vantage
English Harbour is one of Antigua's crown jewels, so it should be no surprise that Fort Berkeley was erected to protect this excellent protected bay. Placed on the peninsula on the western entrance, this fort has been enforcing entry to the anchorage for nearly 300 years. Today, the fort is mostly ruins, but it still supplies visitors with stunning views of the harbor. From Nelson's Dockyard it's a fairly short 10-minute stroll to the ramparts and well worth the walk. From here you can see the dockyard's waterfront, every boat that enters the bay, and beautiful Galleon Beach on the opposite shore.
See Nelson's Dockyard from a Whole New Vantage
1 experience, added to 1 List

Blue Waters Resort and Spa
Saint John, Antigua and Barbuda

Blue Waters Resort and Spa, Saint John, Antigua and Barbuda
Everything You Could Hope for (And More) in Antigua
Blue Waters is luxury and elegance made manifest and placed with love amid 17 acres of lush Caribbean gardens in the northwestern corner of Antigua. What could you hope for from a resort like Blue Waters? Spacious, well-appointed bedrooms? Of course. Romantic cliffside dining that supplies stunning views of Caribbean sunsets? A soothing, bougainvillea-wrapped spa stocked with Elemis products—the leading British luxury skincare brand? How about not one, not two, but three secluded beaches at your disposal? Or maybe you'd prefer an immaculate infinity pool that juts practically right out into the Caribbean Sea? If you've dreamed it, Blue Waters likely has it... Or better.
Everything You Could Hope for (And More) in Antigua
1 experience, added to 1 List

St. Barnabas Anglican Church
Liberta, Antigua and Barbuda

St. Barnabas Anglican Church, Liberta, Antigua and Barbuda
Being Green Isn't Easy at St. Barnabas
You run across a lot of churches while driving around Antigua. Modest, majestic, and everything in-between, there’s a house of worship to suit most every style. Then, there’s St. Barnabas… Upon first seeing St. Barnabas, though, I just had to stop. It’s just so… umm… striking. Yes, that’s the word: striking, both in its seemingly random mishmash of structural additions and its color *ahem* scheme. It’s the green that really struck me the most; a most unnatural hue (or so I thought) that called to mind the horror of Frankenstein, or the slime from that old Nickelodeon slime. At least that would be someone's first impression. Upon learning a little more about the structure, you're bound to hear about something called Antigua green stone. Indeed, the structure and its color are as natural as can be! The unique stone comes from the Liberta area of Antigua, where the Church is found. All around here you see homes, walls, and other buildings sporting the same green hue.
Being Green Isn't Easy at St. Barnabas
1 experience, added to 1 List

Shirley Heights
Saint Paul, Antigua and Barbuda

Shirley Heights, Saint Paul, Antigua and Barbuda
Take a Stand at Shirley Heights
Shirley Heights is less a fort to explore and more of a sprawling military complex. Named after Sir Thomas Shirley, governor of the Leeward Islands and credited with strengthening Antigua's defenses in 1781, Shirley Heights was Britain's last stronghold in the Americas, along with Barbados, after they'd lost every other colony in the new world. In those tumultuous times, Shirley Heights' formidable fortifications protected Antigua's large sugar-producing estates and the all-important dockyard where war ships and trading vessels docked, restocked, and left to sail the Caribbean for Britain's interests. Today, the majority of the complex has long crumbled away, but it's definitely worth the visit. The main lookout is now a restaurant hosting a large weekly sunset party on Sunday as well as concerts, but beyond that history buffs walking these walls can come in contact with Antigua's rich history.
Take a Stand at Shirley Heights
4 experiences, added to 8 Lists

Curtain Bluff Resort
Old Road, Antigua and Barbuda

Curtain Bluff Resort, Old Road, Antigua and Barbuda
Experience an Antigua Classic
Draped across a picturesque bluff jutting out into crystal clear seas in the south of the island, Curtain Bluff is an Antigua classic. Originally opened as a small 22-room labor of love in 1962, constant love, improvement, and expansion has turned this island home away from home into a 77-room world-class resort. On a recent visit, I stayed in an older portion of the property, but you wouldn't know it. The deluxe room was well appointed with a rain shower, spacious bedroom, and, best of all, a terrance that lead straight out onto the sands of Surf Beach — complete with an idyllic hammock hung between two palm trees barely 10 feet from my door. While those features were more than enough to make my stay memorable, know the property also boasts a brand new spa, multiple excellent restaurants, two beaches (with another right next door), and even four championship hard tennis courts!
Experience an Antigua Classic
1 experience, added to 3 Lists

Hawksbill Beach Resort
Five Islands village, Antigua and Barbuda

Hawksbill Beach Resort, Five Islands village, Antigua and Barbuda
Four Beaches and a Fun Time
Hidden out past quaint Five Islands Village, Hawksbill resort is seamlessly sprinkled over 37 acres of Caribbean gardens right on the water. Sure, Antigua is known for its 365 beaches so it shouldn't be a surprise when a resort has more then one beach, but Hawksbill has, an impressive, four secluded strips of sugar-white sand easily accessible to guests with a fifth accessible to truly intrepid sun worshipers. Besides the sheer quantity, Hawksbill also sports a one-of-a-kind beach for Antigua. Beyond the southern point of the the 99 non-smoking guest rooms, down a little path, through a white fence, and around the bend is Eden Beach — Antigua's one and only extremely concealed clothing-optional shore. It's here, a matter of meters into the Caribbean Sea, that you'll find majestic Hawksbill Rock (so named for its uncanny resemblance to a hawk's profile) from which the property gets its name.
Four Beaches and a Fun Time
1 experience

Carlisle Bay
Old Road, Antigua and Barbuda

Carlisle Bay, Old Road, Antigua and BarbudaAfar thumbnail
Experience the Very Definition of Caribbean Luxury
Pop quiz, hot shot! Define Caribbean luxury in 2 words or less. My answer is easy: Carlisle Bay. The moment I walked across the dark wood bridge (flanked on both sides by billowing, flaming torches) that carries guests over a reflecting pool into the heart of the property's great house, I somehow suspected this truth. Then I was expertly shown to an ocean suite. Then I knew for sure. The rooms are a unique blend of modern, clean lines and classic, West Indian touches. From the charred coconut tree trunks serving as planters, to the unique prints gracing the closets, to the curved mahogany day bed on the oceanfront balcony, to a flawless orchid that's refreshed daily, the rooms are near perfection.
Experience the Very Definition of Caribbean Luxury
2 experiences, added to 20 Lists

Long Bay Beach
Saint Philip, Antigua and Barbuda

Long Bay Beach, Saint Philip, Antigua and Barbuda
Sample Sugar-Sweet Long Bay Beach Before the Crowds
No guide to Antigua's beaches would be complete without including Long Bay Beach. Unquestionably, it's one of the island's finest beaches. The sand is almost blindingly white, like someone poured out a billion sugar shakers. The water is exceptionally clear and calm, especially at the eastern end where even toddlers could safely roam the shoreline without the fear of being barreled over by waves. There's even good snorkeling near the beach's reef, which you can actually walk out to! So, why don't I love Long Bay Beach? Well, it can get a bit busy for my taste. There's several restaurants including Mama Pastas, resorts including Grand Pineapple, and even a clutch of tiny shops selling local goods. So, if you're like me, get here as early as possible. Maybe go for a morning run on the impressive sand. Then move on as the masses begin to descend.
Sample Sugar-Sweet Long Bay Beach Before the Crowds
1 experience, added to 4 Lists

Bush Bay
Saint John, Antigua and Barbuda

Bush Bay, Saint John, Antigua and Barbuda
Hideaway at Bush Bay
Completely off-the-beaten-path and almost totally secluded in the northwest of Antigua is diminutive Bush Beach. I was staying at Blue Waters Resort when I felt the need for a little exercise, so I swung by their water sports shed to check out a kayak. I asked where I should go, to which the guy answered: "You should really stay in the bay here where I can see you... but if you want, you can try going around the bluff. There's a beach back there no one goes to." A beach no one goes to? Sign me up! Kayaking around the bluff wasn't too difficult and the reward? Well, you're looking at it. An untouched bush-lined beach all to myself! For those not staying at Blue Waters, there's a slightly hidden path down to the beach from the road... Just don't tell too many people about it!
Hideaway at Bush Bay
1 experience, added to 3 Lists

Darkwood Beach
Saint Mary, Antigua and Barbuda

Darkwood Beach, Saint Mary, Antigua and Barbuda
Pull Up to a Roadside Beach Worth a Visit
I generally have a thing against beaches next to the road. Usually, they're unfortunate victims to automotive pollution: obnoxious noises, exhaust fumes, and sneaky greases seeping into everything. Darkwood Beach is different. Sure, it's right on the road on the southwest coast of Antigua, but somehow it escapes the usual woes of roadside sands. Maybe it's because the road is fairly quiet. Or maybe it's the persistent onshore trade winds. Or maybe it's because people care enough to keep the beach clean. Regardless, what you, the traveler, get is a great beach with good swimming and snorkeling, plus a beach bar serving rum and traditional West Indian eats — complete with white plastic chairs in the sand.
Pull Up to a Roadside Beach Worth a Visit
1 experience, added to 2 Lists

The Buzz
Bolands, Antigua and Barbuda

The Buzz, Bolands, Antigua and Barbuda
Get Loud With Locals Over BBQ at The Buzz
Loud, local, and right along the road, The Buzz embodies many of the choice characteristics to look for in an authentic West Indian watering hole. The Buzz is probably most beloved for its BBQ chicken, but for that, you'd need to get there fairly early in the evening before it's long gone. But don't worry if you miss the chicken, their pork is smoky, saucy, grease-filled and messy – the perfect late-night munchie! The staff is also pretty cool, though not overly chatty. (There isn’t much talking with all the loud music that makes a night at The Buzz a night at The Buzz.) Like most places, everyone was plenty friendly and welcoming when approached with a smile. The Buzz is located just a few minutes north of Sugar Ridge right on the side of the road. It’s seriously impossible to miss, and well-worth a stop for great late-night BBQ.
Get Loud With Locals Over BBQ at The Buzz
1 experience, added to 2 Lists

Cavell's
Saint Mary, Antigua and Barbuda

Cavell's, Saint Mary, Antigua and Barbuda
Go Undercover for Authentic Antiguan Eats
Cavell’s Cook Shop hides in plain sight along the road that hugs the shore on Antigua’s southwestern coast. Its humble, nondescript outward appearance bears every likeness of a simple storage shed or roadside workshop. Thick, encroaching foliage on either side further suggest its owner might prefer his or her place to maintain a low profile. The long line of cars regularly parked astride the road outside Cavell’s at all hours of the day, however, tells a different story. So too do the savory aromas emanating from beneath her galvanize roof, and the smiles on the faces of her steady stream of people filing in and out of here. You see, small and simple though it may be, Cavell’s is the prime spot for real local food in Antigua. The sun pounding down on the galvanize roof combined with the heat put forth by the various cooking apparatuses maKe standing inside Cavell’s feel like limin’ in an oven. No one was complaining, though. Cold Wadadli’s and good company have a way of keeping things cool here. Come to Cavell’s with a smile, some patience, and an open mind and you’ll make friends of the broad swath of local Antiguans, representing all walks of life, easily.
Go Undercover for Authentic Antiguan Eats
1 experience, added to 2 Lists

Antigua Distillery
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda

Antigua Distillery, Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
Taste Cavalier 5-Year-Old Rum—an Antigua Original
Going all the way back to 1934, the Antigua Distillery has been producing some of the most popular flavors on the island. Back then, the fledgling distillery bought a number of estates and a sugar factory. This sugar, named Mucovado, was a favorite among Antiguans. In the early 1950s the molasses byproduct went on to become Cavalier Muscovado Rum—a hearty, full-bodied, black rum. As rum tastes evolved toward lighter-bodied expressions, so did the Antigua Distillery; refining their lineup to eventually include Cavalier 5 Year Old Rum. This amber spirit is just the thing for accompanying lazy days on Antigua's many beaches, visits to local BBQs, some light sailing, or taking in spectacular sunsets at Shirley Heights. Perfectly fine on its own over ice, expect a medium-bodied, fairly dry rum with a pleasantly long smokey finish.
Taste Cavalier 5-Year-Old Rum—an Antigua Original
1 experience, added to 1 List

Antigua Distillery
Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda

Antigua Distillery, Saint John's, Antigua and Barbuda
Real Men Drink Wadadli Gold
Wadadli Gold is the stronger, somewhat meatier version of Antigua’s national brew. I say somewhat as its 5.6% alcohol by volume is only .6% beyond that of regular Wadadli. Wadadli Gold is decidedly more robust, potent, and cockier than its older sibling. The consistency is a bit thicker, perhaps more malty as well, filling your mouth and your belly like a boss. No, it’s not a great option for a day at the beach, but out at the bar, or at a cricket match, it’s mantastic! Look for Wadadli Gold in cans (it’s not available in bottles) all over Antigua… if you dare!
Real Men Drink Wadadli Gold
1 experience, added to 1 List
1 to 27 of 188