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David Farley

AFAR Contributing Writer

New York, New York, United States

www.dfarley.com

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(Private House)
Ubud, Indonesia

(Private House), Ubud, Indonesia
A Porklicious Feast in Bali
Babi Guling might be one of the best pork dishes on the planet. Laced with turmeric, garlic, ginger and other spices, babi guling (literally turning pig) is roasted over an open flame for hours. The finished product is a ultra juicy meat and skin that is cracker crisp. I ate it everywhere, especially at the couple of locations of Ibu Oka in Ubud, but this photo is from a friend's father's house where he makes babi guling for private parties and restaurants, located just outside of Ubud.
A Porklicious Feast in Bali
1 experience

Maxwell Hawker Centre
Singapore, Singapore

Maxwell Hawker Centre, Singapore, Singapore
I <3 Hawker Food!
If you've spent any time in Singapore, you love Hawker food too. Hawker centers are government-run food halls, who monitor the centers to keep them clean and the prices low. You can eat very well here. This particularly spot is famous for Tian Tian, the shop that sells quite possibly the best chicken rice in town.
I <3 Hawker Food!
1 experience, added to 1 List

Boucan by Hotel Chocolat
Jalousle, Saint Lucia

Boucan by Hotel Chocolat, Jalousle, Saint Lucia
Drinking a Piton at a Piton
In St. Lucia, visitors are practically contractually obligated to take a photo of one of the two pitons (or, preferably, both) and post it somewhere online. So this was my attempt -- except I managed to sneak a bottle of local PIton beer into the shot too.
Drinking a Piton at a Piton
1 experience

Kovac Carda
Zmajevac, Croatia

Kovac Carda, Zmajevac, Croatia
Fiery Fish Paprikash
In this part of the Balkans, where Croatia, Serbia, and Hungary meet, fish paprikash is a common dining staple. Here in the Croatian town of Zmajevac, are five pots of paprika-laced fish being cooked outside of a restaurant, spotted on my big hike across Serbia and Croatia (the story of which was published in the March/April 2016 issue of AFAR).
Fiery Fish Paprikash
1 experience, added to 1 List

Embassy of Liberland
Bački Monoštor, Serbia

Embassy of Liberland, Bački Monoštor, Serbia
The Planet's Newest "Nation"
On a hike across Vojvodena in Serbia ("The Path to Peace" in the March/April 2016 issue of AFAR), I got the chance to hang out in the first (and only) embassy to Liberland, a newly created country on a supposed piece of no man's land on the Danube between Serbia and Croatia. I didn't get to meet the "president," Vit Jedlička, but I did chat with Doroteja Pospihalj, the press secretary for the would-be Libertarian country. When I told her that many locals were troubled that the existence of Liberland could destabilize a region historically prone to violent clashes, she sounded naïvely optimistic: “We’re all about peace and love in Liberland. In fact, tomorrow we’re going to sail across the Danube and declare that land ours. We’re going to show up with hundreds of flowers.” Just then a Czech guy in his mid twenties, Jaromir Miskovsky, sitting at a table about 20 feet away, yelled out, “It’s called Operation Flower Storm!” I asked if they’d be naming anything after Ayn Rand in Liberland. “Probably a street,” Doroteja said. “And, of course, Slavoj Zizek, too.” She was referring to the popular Slovenian philosopher. When I noted that Zizek is a Marxist which was at odds with the libertarian philosophy behind Liberland, she shrugged and said, “I think he’d agree with what we’re doing here.”
The Planet's Newest "Nation"
1 experience, added to 1 List

Mira & Mirko's House
Apatin, Serbia

Mira & Mirko's House, Apatin, Serbia
Beer, Rakia, and Pig Fat
Just what one needs after a day of traipsing through the Serbian countryside in insane heat with no water. When my friend Dusko and I limped into Apetin, a lovely town on the Danube River, we were greeted at his parents' house with nuggets of fried pig fat, cold beer, and as much homemade rakia as we could drink.
Beer, Rakia, and Pig Fat
1 experience, added to 1 List

Ganges River
Varanasi, India

Ganges River, Varanasi, India
The Lord of the Dead
The Dom Raja, also known as the Lord of the Dead, rowed me across the sacred Ganges River one morning while I was in town for a week and a half to do a feature for AFAR (see the June 2014 issue or the link below). He, along with his brothers, control the divine fire with which all bodies are cremated in Varanasi, thus helping the soul escape the cycle of re-birth, sending them straight to moksha or nirvana. According to local historian, Professor Rana P.B. Singh, director of the Benares Hindu University’s geography department, and with whom I visited one day at his office in Varanasi, the title of Dom Raja emerged around 1805. Since that time the Choudhary family (the name which all doms share) has had the rights to the title “Dom Raja.” And like royalty, it went to the eldest son when the patriarch died. But when the Dom Raja, Kailash Choudhary, passed away in 1985, something interesting happened: there was a power struggle in the family and, eventually, the five sons decided to split up the duties. Now there are Dom Rajas, all from the same family, who have exclusive control over Manikarnika ghat and Harischandra ghat, the two cremation centers along the river, about a half mile apart. And because of their inherent control over the cremation ghats and the sacred fire, the Dom Rajas are—despite also being of the untouchable caste—among the richest people in town.
The Lord of the Dead
1 experience, added to 2 Lists

Manikarnika Ghat
Varanasi, India

Manikarnika Ghat, Varanasi, India
Backstage in Varanasi
The scene behind Manikarnika ghat, the main cremation ground in Varanasi, looks like a medieval workshop. In the dank shadowy lanes, it feels like you’re watching workers backstage laboring for the performance happening out front, as if they’re roadies of death. A crouched man hammered spikes into banyan logs to split into smaller pieces; a fifty-year-old man with deep, wrinkled etches in his face hovered over a pot of boiling chai, fueled by a coal flame; another man was selling the cotton shrouds that are wrapped around the soon-to-be-burned bodies. The honking cacophony of Varanasi felt hundreds of years away. And if you stop here to take it all in—as I was doing at this moment—you’ll find few reminders of what century you’re in, as if that plane you flew here on had inadvertently flown right into an open doorway in the sky, traveling through the space-time continuum, landing somewhere in the 11th century.
Backstage in Varanasi
1 experience, added to 3 Lists

New York Public Library
New York, New York

New York Public Library, New York, New York
Booze and Books
For one night each year, the main branch of the New York Public Library -- the iconic neoclassical building on Fifth Ave. and 42nd St. -- becomes one massive bar. Welcome to the Manhattan Cocktail Classic, a bibulous four-day event that is kicked off by a gala at the library. This year over 3,000 thirsty attendees turned up to sip every kind of cocktail imaginable.
Booze and Books
1 experience, added to 2 Lists

Big Buddha Phuket
Karon, Thailand

Big Buddha Phuket, Karon, Thailand
Big Buddha
The name says it all: Big Buddha Phuket, sitting 150 feet tall on a high mountain, is one of the major landmarks and most visited sites that doesn't involve waves and sand, on the Thai island of Phuket.
Big Buddha
2 experiences, added to 5 Lists

St. Dymphna Cemetery, Achill Island
Mayo, Ireland

St. Dymphna Cemetery, Achill Island, Mayo, Ireland
On the Island with St. Dymphna
St. Dymphna, a seventh-century peasant who was eventually canonized, is said to have founded the church that this atmospheric cemetery is centered around. Dymphna is the patron saint of mental and nervous disorders and if you're uptight or have anxiety, Achill will definitely put you at ease. After all, this aesthetically pleasing cemetery isn't the only reason to come to Achill Island, Ireland's largest island, located in County Mayo on the country's western shores. There's a ghostly deserted village, a 26-mile bike trail that leads you to the island (the Great Western Greenway, starting in the town of Westport) and people so friendly you'll wonder what is in the water (or the Guinness). But the main reason to come to Achill are for the spectacular views. Drive around the periphery of the island—as I recently did—and prepare to be shocked and awed by some of the most stunning scenery your eyes will encounter while in Ireland. You'll pray to St. Dymphna that luck and fortune will bring you back here some day.
On the Island with St. Dymphna
1 experience, added to 13 Lists

Lynott's Pub
Mayo, Ireland

Lynott's Pub, Mayo, Ireland
The Coziest Pub in Ireland
"Want to go to the coziest pub in Ireland?" the waiter of the hotel restaurant I was eating at said when I asked where there was a good place to get a drink on Achill Island, located in County Mayo on the west coast of Ireland. He'd said three of my favorite words in one sentence: "cozy," "pub," and "Ireland." I was sold. Soon enough my traveling companion and I were hoisting pints of black, foamy Guinness by the fireplace in Lynott's an ancient stone pub with four tables. The night I turned up, there was a traditional music session happening and there were most musicians than patrons. Cozy indeed.
The Coziest Pub in Ireland
1 experience, added to 12 Lists

Achill Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland.
Mayo, Ireland

Achill Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland., Mayo, Ireland
Don't forget your humongous shoes for the trip!
Achill Island, the largest island off of the coast of Ireland, is home to some seriously spectacular scenery. As the signs on this island of 2,700 people indicate, if you fall off a cliff, make sure you're holding a pair of humongous shoes.
Don't forget your humongous shoes for the trip!
1 experience, added to 1 List

Da Enzo Al 29 Sas Di Di Felice Roberto & C.
Rome, Italy

Da Enzo Al 29 Sas Di Di Felice Roberto & C., Rome, Italy
Eggs and bacon, Italian style
No one is really sure where Carbonara comes from. Some say the pasta dish made with eggs, pancetta (or guanciale) and cheese was created by the carbonai, or coal workers, because it's a simple, cheap dish. Other say it was created after World War II for American soldiers who yearned for their bacon and eggs. Whatever the case, if you're in Rome, you must order it at least once. On a recent visit, I tried to eat carbonara at every restaurant I visited. The best I had was at Da Enzo. Located in Trastevere, Da Enzo is popular with locals and off the radar for tourists. Which is always a good sign.
Eggs and bacon, Italian style
1 experience, added to 3 Lists

Hotel Lone
Rovinj, Croatia

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Hotel Lone, Istria
From the outside, Hotel Lone (pronounced LO-nay) looks like a giant zebra-stripe cruise liner. The 236 rooms and 12 suites feature private balconies that wrap around the property like corridors on a ship. Inside, rooms are decorated with textiles inspired by 15th-century Croatian frescoes. A new nightclub will host jazz and blues concerts through September. From $362, 385/(0) 52-800-250. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue. Image: courtesy of Hotel Lone
Hotel Lone, Istria
1 experience, added to 29 Lists

Marina
Novigrad, Croatia

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Raw Fish in Istria
There’s a budding movement in Istria to serve raw fish parts traditionally eaten in fishermen’s homes. At Batelina (Čimulje 25, Banjole, 385/ (0) 52-573-767), chef David Skoko prepares mostly raw dishes from seafood caught each morning. The menu at Marina (Svati Antona 38, Novigrad, 385/(0) 52-726-691) emphasizes Italian-accented crudo dishes such as scallops and sole served over rice and red cabbage. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue. Image: Paola Sucato/Flickr.com
Raw Fish in Istria
1 experience, added to 19 Lists

Grožnjan
Bijele Zemlje, Croatia

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Jazz Festival in Grožnjan, Istria
Every July and August, the artsy town of Grožnjan swells with visitors who come for classical music concerts and the annual Jazz Is Back festival, held July 13 through August 3 this year. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue. Image: Zolakoma/Flickr.com
Jazz Festival in Grožnjan, Istria
1 experience, added to 58 Lists

Buzet
Buzet, Croatia

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Buzet, Istria
Buzet is an ideal town for wandering. Afterward, settle into the Vela Vrata hotel (pictured) near the church of St. George and its stone city gate, both built during the Venetian empire. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue.
Buzet, Istria
1 experience, added to 22 Lists

Motovun
Motovun, Croatia

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Motovun Film Festival, Istria
A 13th-century campanile crowns Motovun. Time your visit with the Motovun Film Festival (July 27−31, 2013), which screens international films outdoors and in historic theaters. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue. Image: Nina Đurđević and Nikola Zelmanović
Motovun Film Festival, Istria
1 experience, added to 12 Lists

Buzet
Buzet, Croatia

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Subotina Festival, Istria
The Subotina Festival in Buzet (held September 7–8 this year) revolves around white and black truffles, but there’s also abundant local olive oil, prosciutto, and herb-infused rakija, homemade brandy popular throughout the Balkans. The weekend’s main attraction will be the making of an omelet with 2,013 eggs (for the year 2013) and, of course, truffles. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue. Image: StockFood/Meier - StockFood Munich
Subotina Festival, Istria
1 experience, added to 26 Lists

Pilatès Stairs
Rome, Italy

Pilatès Stairs, Rome, Italy
Saintly Steps
It is, at first, a startling sight to walk into the Lateran Palace in Rome and see a staircase crammed with people on their knees. It all began with Saint Helena, mother of Roman Emperor Constantine, who went on a sanctified shopping spree in the Holy Land in the fourth century. She brought back to Rome a piece of the true cross, a few thorns from Christ's crown, and even the finger from doubting Thomas. She also brought back this staircase which allegedly came from Pontius Pilate's palace in Jerusalem. Which, for believers, means that these stairs are where Christ took his last few steps before being condemned. Today, the Scala Santa, or Holy Steps, are one of the most popular spots in Rome for pilgrims who ascend the steps on their knees, reciting a prayer for each of the 28 steps.
Saintly Steps
1 experience, added to 4 Lists

Aachen Cathedral
Aachen, Germany

Aachen Cathedral, Aachen, Germany
A is for Aachen
Aachen might not be what it used to be in the ninth century when the great king Charlemagne made it the base for his half-continent-wide empire. And much of the historic city might have been destroyed in World War II, but this Germany city is still an aesthetically pleasing site for the eyes.
A is for Aachen
1 experience, added to 1 List

(Random Street)
Conques, France

(Random Street), Conques, France
Getting Conqued
Conques, located in the Midi-Pyrenees in the south of France, is not an easy place to find. Unless, of course, you're hiking the Santiago de Compostela pilgrimage route. The medieval village, which boasts a gorgeous cathedral and an ample amount of twee lanes, is packed with pilgrims and hikers have are making the long trek through France and Spain.
Getting Conqued
1 experience, added to 50 Lists

Jimmy's Corner
New York, New York

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Times Square's Last Dive Bar
Jimmy’s Corner is long and narrow, as if some great prophet looked at a hallway and said, I see a dimly lit saloon here, complete with an extended bar and walls plastered with photos of boxers. Opened in 1971 by erstwhile pugilist James Lee Glenn, Jimmy’s sits midblock on West 44th Street, between Sixth Avenue and Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan. Which is what makes this no-frills bar unique. It’s a classic American dive, and the only one around, a relic from when the Times Square area was more depravity than Disney. Bartenders, who can spot a near-empty glass with the eyes of a hawk, are friendly but gruff. Case in point: As a 50-something woman with spiky bleached blonde hair mixed me another whiskey soda, I nodded to the boxer-bedecked wall behind the bar and said to my friend, “They don’t really like boxing much here, do they?” The bartender looked down the bar, pointed her finger at me, and bellowed with a thick Russian accent, “He make feeble attempt at joke!” She might have been right. If you go to this watering hole, make sure you’re thirsty (drinks are cheap) and your jokes are not so feeble. This appeared in the August/September 2013 issue. Image courtesy of Shanna Ravindra
Times Square's Last Dive Bar
1 experience, added to 34 Lists

St. Lawrence Market
Toronto, Canada

St. Lawrence Market, Toronto, Canada
Oink Oink in Toronto
Toronto's St. Lawrence Market is crammed with butcher counters and bakeries, ethnic eateries and seafood shops. But there's one main reason why most people come here: the peameal bacon sandwich, which is served at the Carousel Bakery. It's not really bacon -- or at least not the kind you usually eat -- but rather tender, thicker strips of pork from the loin and then rolled in cornmeal. It's a porklicious treat!
Oink Oink in Toronto
3 experiences, added to 7 Lists

Paradis Malahide
Rubavu, Rwanda

Paradis Malahide, Rubavu, Rwanda
Sambaza!
Many people today travel to Rwanda to gawk at the great mountain gorillas. I was no exception but I did take a couple days to explore the north-western part of this small African nation. While sitting on the banks of Lake Kivu staring across at Goma, the town just over the border of the Democratic Republic of Congo, I nibbled on sambaza, fried minnows, a specialty pulled out of the lake.
Sambaza!
1 experience

Nakasero Market
Kampala, Uganda

Nakasero Market, Kampala, Uganda
A Grasshopper Lunch
Smack in the center of the Ugandan capital, Kampala, sits bustling Nakasero Market. The busy market has a live animal section as well as departments for household appliances and clothes and whatever else you might need. There are also plenty of venders selling grasshoppers, a common Ugandan snack. I'm a very adventurous eater but when faced with the prospect of munching on grasshoppers, I suddenly became not very hungry.
A Grasshopper Lunch
2 experiences, added to 12 Lists
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