The Mayflower Grace Hotel
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Go Natural
A great story can be told through bites of local culture. Such was the case on a recent adventure in search of the East Coast’s finest lobster dishes. My travels took me to the incredible Mayflower Grace hotel and the dining room at Muse, one of New England’s most highly regarded restaurants. I had to come home with mouth-watering images that could sell both destination and dish, but I didn’t have time to dress a set, decorate the food, or design a complicated lighting plan—Muse was busy and I had one chance to get the images I needed. I’m a stickler for continuity, so I usually rely on one lens (a 50mm f/1.4 prime) and off-camera flashes in small softboxes for my food shooting. But in this case, I couldn’t set up the flashes for fear of affecting the experience of other guests, and I only had one lens—thankfully, it was the new Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD MACRO. I locked my lens at 50mm, dialed in an aperture to focus on the food, and fired away using natural light coming through the window. My new Tamron helped me capture print-quality images in a fraction of the time I normally would have spent. The Vibration Reduction feature kept the image sharp even in fairly low light, and the outstanding close focus distance allowed me to zoom in on the lobster sliders while maintaining my 50mm focal length. I’d say that counts as spectacular versatility. By the way—the sliders were one of the most delicious things I’ve ever tasted and as incredible as they look.
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