Sand Harbor of Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park
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A Sunrise in Lake Tahoe
Most people feel as though they've died and gone to photography Heaven when they visit Lake Tahoe, and I was one of them. Slivers of blue between the coniferous forest, striated clouds patching a brilliantly blue sky means there is more than the world to photograph here. Tahoe, in the Sierra Nevada, is one of the deepest lakes in the world and the second deepest lake in the United States with a maximum depth of 1,645 feet. The name Tahoe has several interpretations: some say it means “Silver Lake” and that’s a romantic name I can get behind; yet others say it means “grasshopper soup,” which is one of the dishes the Washoe Indians made when they settled on the edge of the lake. And, in some circles, Tahoe means “Lake Edge.” Photographing Lake Tahoe is easy--a child will tell you that: simply point and snap with just about any camera and you have a more than acceptable souvenir. But if you want to get the best shot of the lake during sunrise and sunset, head on over to Sands Harbor in Incline Village, Nevada, by 6am (which is when the boat basin opens) and snap away. Sands Harbor has unforgettably large beautifully sculpted glacial rocks that the other side of Lake Tahoe does not. During the winter, the reflection of the light on the water generates a brilliant spectrum of colors, especially during sunrise. Entry to the Boat Basin is $12 for each vehicle.
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