Park Hyatt, Tokyo
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Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Park Hyatt, Tokyo
Immortalized on celluloid in the film Lost in Translation, the modernist property spreads across the upper floors of the three connecting granite, steel, and glass columns of Shinjuku Park Tower. The 770-foot building rises in a succession of summits with a glass pyramid topping the three peaks, the pyramids home to a bamboo garden, swimming pool, and restaurant, respectively. The interiors replicate the exterior materials, while adding wood, woven abaca, and hand-tufted wool carpets for texture and color. The clean design scheme features muted hues of deep green marble, brown and gray granite, and plenty of windows and mirrors. Rooms, starting at a shade under 600 square feet, are similarly spare, and include bedside glass knobs that control room functions and walls paneled with rare water elm from Hokkaido, some that were submerged in lakes up to 2,000 years.
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Neighborhood Vibe
The hotel’s location in Shinjuku puts it close to shopping, businesses, and entertainment. In the Shinjuku Park Tower, the same building that houses the Park Hyatt, shoppers will find the Living Design Center Ozone—four stories of shops, galleries, and showrooms dedicated to upscale, contemporary interior design. Just north of the property, Shinjuku Central Park is a calm green space in a densely urban environment, and popular lunchtime spot for office workers. The Tokyo Opera City—an entertainment complex comprising shops, restaurants, the New National Theater, the Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall, and the Art Gallery—is about five minutes away on foot to the southwest. Next to Yoyogi Park, and 15 minutes walking distance from the Park Hyatt, Meiji Jingu Shrine is dedicated to the spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife Empress Shoken. It is Tokyo’s largest shrine, and one of Japan’s three Imperial shrines. It opens and closes with sunrise and sunset.
Need to Know
Rooms: 154 rooms, 23 suites. From $530.
Check-in: 3 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options: Set in the highest glass pyramid, New York Grill re-creates a classic Manhattan steakhouse with a kinetic open kitchen, black-and-chrome interiors, and four huge paintings of New York scenes. The skylit bamboo garden is the centerpiece of the Peak Lounge, making a verdant setting for English afternoon tea. French brasserie Girandole throws a few Asian favorites onto its menu, while Kozue serves hearty, home-style Japanese dishes to the backdrop of views of Mount Fuji. New York Bar is where, in the movie, Bill Murray was seen knocking back libations most nights.
Spa and gym details: Divided between the 45th and 47th floors, Club on the Park dedicates 22,000 square feet to wellness. Expect a swimming pool, full gym, aerobics studio, spa with seven treatment rooms, Vichy showers, wet and dry saunas, cold plunge pools, and marble whirlpools.
Insider Tips
Who's it for: Movie buffs; CEOs; movers and shakers.
Our favorite rooms: Any with a Mount Fuji view. That’s a vista hard to beat.
Explore on two wheels: The hotel offers free bicycle rental for guests—lock, helmets, pumps, and maps provided.
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