Pacific Tsunami Museum
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Remembering the Waves
If you visit Hilo, Puna, and the Hamakua regions of the Big Island, you’ll undoubtedly experience a bit of rain which keeps the windward coast lush and green—and full of rainbows (tip: if you’re desperate for sun, it can usually be found on the Kona side of the Island). Though tropical storms occasionally brush by the Island of Hawaii, creating some challenging site seeing conditions, tsunamis are not a normal experience in the Hawaiian Islands. However, tsunamis are possible—and you don’t have to go back very far in history to find the 1960 tsunami in Hilo. About 30 years later survivors began an effort to memorialize the event. The Museum not only commemorates the lives lost tsunami and the stories of survivors, but continues to add more exhibits about tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean and present continued scientific efforts to predict the waves and prevent the loss of human life. The Museum also encourages and sponsors outreach efforts in the community to promote awareness and safe evacuation procedures. If you need a place to escape the rain in Hilo, pop in at the Tsunami Museum and learn more about the giant waves.
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