Overseas Chinese Museum
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Understand the Chinese Diaspora at Its Source
One of the world's largest diasporas is that of the Chinese, or as those still on the mainland call them, Huaqiao. The first several waves of these "Overseas Chinese" emigrated from the southeastern coastal provinces of Guangdong and Fujian, and Xiamen (known then as Amoy) was one of the major ports for outbound migration. More recently, it has also been one of the major points for haigui, or overseas Chinese, who have returned since China threw open its doors in the early 1980s, another topic explored in this informative, free museum, founded by haigui benefactors Tan Kah Ke. Two floor of exhibits explain the history of the Overseas Chinese through photographs, maps, life-size dioramas, and artifacts. The treatment of history is balanced, showing both the the grim and the glorious. Visitors can trace the evolution of the Chinese diaspora from the early explorers of the Ming Dynasty into the age of European imperialism, when cheap Chinese laborers, or "coolies" first moved en masse to the West and its colonies, and on into the Twentieth century when Chinese earned names for themselves around the world as scholars, scientists, industrialists, and philanthropists. A map showing the number of Chinese in each country is full of fascinating tidbits, such as that seven million Chinese live in Indonesia, and 1.3 million live in Peru. Open 8:30-16:30. Closed on Mondays. 493 Siming Nan Lu 思明南路293号
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