Nestor's Cave
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Nestor’s Cave
Nestor's Cave
Nestor’s Cave
Nestor's Cave
Nestor’s Cave

In Greek mythology, Heracles slew all the sons of the King of Pylos except Nestor, who became king of Pylos himself. Nestor appears as a sage elder in both the Iliad and the Odyssey, expounding on how things were really tough back in his day. If you visit Voidokilia Beach, about 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) from Pylos, you can take a 15-minute walk to see Nestor’s Cave. First, enjoy your time on the beach, which is renowned for its natural beauty. Then climb over the dunes at the beach's southwest end and follow the hillside path to the cave, which sits just below the ruins of the Paleo Kastro, the old Pylos castle. As legend has it, this cave is where Hermes hid the 50 cattle he stole from Apollo. The trip is worth it for the views alone: The higher you go, the more you'll see, as the panorama takes in Voidokilia Bay, the Gialova lagoon, the Bay of Navarino, the Peloponnesian hills and the city of Pylos.

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Nestor's Cave
Located above the southwest end of Voidokilia Beach, a climb to Nestor's Cave awards views of Navarino Bay, the Divari Lagoon of Gialova, and the olive tree-lined Peloponnesian Hills. The cave itself holds a mythical history, believed to belong to Nestor, the son of Neleus. It's also where Hermes supposedly hid 50 oxen stolen from his brother, Apollo. Today, the cave is full of stalactites, bats and a small pool, although a flashlight is recommended as it's dark. For those making the trek, sturdy shoes are a must as the hike is moderately challenging.
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