Moores Creek National Battlefield
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Moores Creek National Battlefield in Currie, NC
An influential glimpse into the Revolutionary War between the patriots and loyalists lies right outside of Wilmington at an 87-acre preservation site in Currie, NC. Here, a reproduction Dutch two-pounder cannon, mounted on an English "galloper" carriage is positioned at a critical point of ambush at the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge site (February 27, 1776) - a metaphorical symbol of today's Independence Day fireworks. Reconstructed earthen mounds on high ground mark the battlefield built by Colonel James Moore’s patriot troops. Implications of winning this small-in-stature battle? Demonstration of patriot strength, discouraged loyalist growth in the Carolinas, and fueled revolutionary sentiment. Had the patriots lost, British conquest would have been made possible. Though a lesser-known battle of the Revolutionary War, victory here sparked North Carolina to influence its delegation to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia to vote for independence from Britain. Records indicate that it was the very first American colony to do so. The 1.3 mile historic trail is neatly paved for all ages, pet-friendly, and is ADA compliant. It meanders through the battlefield site surrounded by woods, creeks, earth mounds, and monuments. Admission is free and a brief, ten-minute video greets visitors upon arrival. Historical reenactments occur annually every February. Hours: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily * Closed on National Holidays
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