Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
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Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
Filling the top floors of the Cesar Pelli–designed Nihonbashi Mitsui Tower, the Mandarin Oriental explores the themes of woods and water. It’s designed as a single large, living tree. The entrance at the base of the tower represents the base of the tree, with rock-clinging, glassy sheets of water suggesting waterfalls that cascade from the mountains to nourish the roots, while the walls of the elevator wall resemble the inner rings of a tree trunk. The top floor, the tree’s canopy, evokes an image of treetops, with fabrics, carpets, and floors suggesting leaves and branches. Tree motifs recur in wallpapers, upholstery, drapery, cushion covers, and more. Rooms have the native patrinia flower motif inlaid into the sofa fabric and also feature large bay windows, and a choice of bamboo or carpeted and walnut flooring. Views from rooms and public areas include the Imperial Palace Garden to the west, Tokyo Skytree and Sumida River to the east, and Tokyo Bay in the distance to the south.
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Neighborhood Vibe
Nihonbashi, the historical and cultural center of Tokyo, rose to prominence in 1603 during the shogunate when a landmark bridge called Nihonbashi was built here and declared to be the point of origin for Japan’s five main roads. Today it’s still the heart of Japan’s economy. From the property, it’s a 10-minute walk to Tokyo Station, Ginza shopping district, Mitsukoshi Department Store, Bank of Japan, the Tokyo Stock Exchange, and the historically important bridge, rebuilt since its first iteration. The commercial complexes of Coredo Nihonbashi, Coredo Muromachi, the Marunouchi Building, the Shin-Marunouchi Building, Marunouchi Oazo, and Marunouchi Brick Square offer visitors a broad range of shops, restaurants, and bars. Tokyo International Forum, a convention and performing arts center, and another landmark, is only a five-minute drive away.
Need to Know
Rooms: 157 rooms, 21 suites. From $560.
Check-in: 3 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options: The restaurants mostly reside on the top two floors of the building, 37 and 38. All-day dining is offered at K’shiki, which also has a Pizza Bar with a clay-and-brick oven, eight-seat counter, and pizzaiolo from Italy. Granite floors and Kawara tile walls beautify Sushi Sora, where the counter of aged cypress seats eight—a stage for the sushi chef. Order haute French at Signature, Cantonese at Sense, Mediterranean at Ventaglio (on the second floor). Expect experimental dishes at Tapas Molecular Bar.
Spa and gym details: The spa merges holistic therapies and philosophies from around the world and has nine treatment rooms, a crystal steam room, and an ice fountain. The gym offers the usual cardiovascular and weight-training equipment, including treadmills, cross-trainers, free weights, and Pilates machines.
Insider Tips
Who's it for: The private-jet crowd; CEOs; diplomats; older couples; anyone who’s comfortable in a tailored suit.
Our favorite rooms: Deluxe Corner Rooms for the abundance of light and peerless city views.
Local highlight: Contact the concierge to book a bushido lesson at the Samurai Training Hall in Nihonbashi, conducted by a samurai master.
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