Hullett House
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Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Hullett House
Residing on the top floors of the former Marine Police Headquarters in Kowloon’s Tsim Sha Tsui district, the Hullett House hotel offers 10 whimsical suites—named for Hong Kong’s various bays—that each play on a different period of Hong Kong history and culture. Built in 1881, the property is a beauty of colonial arches and columns crowned by a red-tile roof; it’s one of the oldest buildings in Hong Kong. Each room was painstakingly restored and then updated with statement furnishings and salvaged materials, and each has at least one balcony that overlooks the city, harbor, or hotel gardens.

The Stanley suite is a tranquil sanctuary of turquoise, white, and gold, whose hand-painted songbirds, French windows, and old fireplace transport guests to the English countryside. The loft-style Deep Water Bay suite is decorated with cheeky pop art pieces, from a white ceramic sculpture of a pig doing an elbow stand to a painting series of Chairman Mao blowing bubbles. The Ma Wan suite has a full Chinese temple erected over the bed!

The Hullett House’s higher price point means guests enjoy the limousine transfers, butlers, and shoe-shining services that recall the old days, alongside the minibars and turndown rituals that are expected today.
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Neighborhood Vibe
The historic Hullett House is tucked between skyscrapers just two blocks from Nathan Road, the main shopping and dining drag in Kowloon. It’s equidistant from Kowloon Park and the Tsim Sha Tsui harborfront, dotted with such attractions as the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Hong Kong Space Museum, and the Avenue of the Stars, which pays homage to the Chinese film industry. Tsim Sha Tsui has become one of the most happening dining districts, thanks to the likes of Felix at the Peninsula Hotel and Din Ta Fung near the Harbour City mall. The mall has great coffee, too; shoppers should start their day at the Coffee Academics before hitting Louis Vuitton or Hermès.
Need to Know
Rooms: 10 suites; from $1,160.
Check-in: 2 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options:The five restaurants and bars at the Hullett House join Chinese and colonial heritage. Loong Toh Yuen serves long-lost Hong Kong dishes—such as shredded pork with black mushrooms, and traditional crispy chicken—in a dining room outfitted with lattice walls and chinoiserie. The Stables Grill is housed in the old marine police stables and now specializes in char-grilled meats and fish; the cylindrical leather lampshades once transported wool to Hong Kong from France, and the wooden wall panels were salvaged from an old Chinese ship. Drinking spots range from the stately to the storied: Guests can sip a “Hulletini” on the colonnaded Parlour balcony or enjoy craft beer and gastropub fare in the Mariners’ Rest, which has existed for more than 100 years and retains some of the original holding cells that once confined unruly sailors or pirates.
Spa and gym details:The boutique hotel does not have a gym or spa. Luckily, it’s not far from Kowloon Park, a great place to unwind or swim in the lap pool. The Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade makes a great running route.
Insider Tips
Who's it best for: Affluent art and history buffs looking for an authentic Hong Kong experience with the flourishes of a luxury hotel.
Our favorite rooms: All the rooms are fantastic, and our favorite changes depending on the occasion, or the day. The Silvermine is an all-white honeymooner’s dream of Louis XIV antiques, velvet draping, and crystal chandeliers, and is one of the hotel’s exclusive corner suites, opening up to three balconies.
Heritage tour:A dailyheritage tour guides hotel guests around the former Marine Police Headquarters complex, sharing tales of underground tunnels built during Japanese occupation and the Signal Tower’s former life as the source of time signals for passing ships.
Original whistler auddev