Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
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Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

Two of the world's most active and accessible volcanoes dominate this national park and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which swoops down to the sea from Mauna Loa's summit at 4,170 meters (13,681 feet). A wilderness area stretches beyond the road's end, filled with cinder cones and rough lava trails that attract serious backpackers. Day-trippers usually hit the slopes of Kilauea (1,250 meters, or 4,101 feet) instead. Its name means "spreading" or "much spewing"—and the mountain delivers with lava flows through lush rain forests. Since its 1983 eruption, Kilauea's east rift zone has continued oozing liquid rock, sometimes as much as 5,000 liters (1,321 gallons) per second, and adding 202 hectares (499 acres) of land to the Big Island.

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Original mauna kea beach hotel