Claska
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Claska
Following a renovation of an old local hotel, Claska opened in 2003 as the first design-style property in Tokyo. Masterminded by architect Tei Shuwa, who also designs furniture and home appliances, the Claska was renovated in 2008 and promises clean, simple, minimalist-leaning interiors. The roster of rooms comes in five categories, crafted by six Japanese creators (including Shuwa). Modern digs have antiques from various parts of Asia, while Tatami rooms combine east and west, hence tatami mats and a bed. The hotel also houses Do, a shop with Japanese artisanal home products and a gallery with exhibits that change each month.
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Neighborhood Vibe
Claska is located outside the heart of the city, a little southwest of the core. The hotel’s focus on its interiors and furniture mirrors aspects of the neighborhood. This part of Meguro Street is known as Interior-dori, or Interior Street, and is, as its name suggests, packed with interior and furniture shops, though visitors will also find bakeries, organic food shops, and clothing stores. Less than 10 minutes from Claska by foot, the Michelin-starred Kappou Suzuki is a lilliputian boîte serving fine Japanese food. Even closer, Tokusue is a more easygoing affair, serving traditional Japanese to mostly Tokyoites.
Need to Know
Rooms: 21 rooms. From $185.
Check-in: 3 p.m.; check-out: noon.
Dining options: The sole restaurant, Kiokuh, serves all meals. Lunches and dinners present Italian and French dishes made with seasonal Japanese ingredients. There is a bar in the lobby.
Spa and gym details: None here.
Insider Tips
Who’s it for: Hipsters, designers, couples, and homeowners looking for inspiration and finds at nearby interior shops.
Our favorite rooms: The three D.I.Y. rooms were completely created by hand. The pick is room 702, Pa jyama, which turns up the whimsy factor with furniture made of plush toys.
Good to know: The rooftop has fabulous views of the city, and it can be reserved for one hour, between 4 p.m. and 10 p.m., for a fee. Reserve three days in advance.
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