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Hikes and Happy Hours
Don't come to Boulder, Colorado in the winter. There is no serious skiing nearby (at least not within a 45-minute drive, so you might as well stay in a resort town) and all the foliage is dead. The mountains and iconic Flatirons may be speckled with snow, but chances are you'll be walking down Pearl Street in a mushy, brown mess. Usually, however, there is no snow at all, and while it may be gloriously sunny out, it's still 37 degrees. Personal experience and subsequent longing has led me to believe that Boulder is a best-kept secret of summer travel. Between mid-May and mid-August, over half of the University of Colorado's student population flees, albeit mistakenly, for home, leaving the rest of the city to indulge in the season's many delights. The farmer's market, held Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings, is as enjoyable for its people-watching opportunities as it is for its fresh food cart cuisine. It's easy to let a summer day slip away at one of the many parks lining Boulder Creek. The more guilt-ridden may choose to burn off those rooftop cocktails from last night with a hike through Chatauqua park or to the summit of Mt. Sanitas. If the often-scorching summer temps won't allow for either, a quick drive west will take you to the cooler elevations of such stunning treasures as Indian Peaks Wilderness, located over 3,000 feet above Boulder. It's been named the fittest, foodiest, and third "booziest" town in America. In the summer, you'll just label it "best".
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