Château du Petit Thouars
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Snacking on Fouée, the Ancient Bread of Touraine
It only looks like pita but this round, airy Fouée bread, a traditional specialty of the Touraine province in France, has a distinct story and utility of its own. According to legend, the Fouée emerged when bakers would test their wood ovens by throwing ripping off a piece of their dough, rolling it into a ball and throwing it into the hearth. Today, their purpose is in sandwiching some of France's most beloved spreads, namely: salted butter, rillettes (pork), regional goat cheese, mogettes and, for the sweet-leaning set, chocolate. My first taste of these delicious little breads was at the Château du Petit Thouars open house over Easter weekend. Maybe it was the unseasonably cold temperatures, the freely-flowing wine or the novelty of the bread, but I was what the French love to call gourmande, indulging in both a piping hot savory Fouée overflowing with herbed goat cheese and one coated with nutella for a sweet finish. To get your hands on these you'll want to plan a trip to the Loire Valley. The region's wine may entice most but I'll return for the bread.
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Is This What Journalism Has Become?
Your article is misleading, to say the least. Fouees are traditional in the Saumurois and in Touraine. The Chateau du Petit Thouars, however, is a winery and does not serve fouees on a daily basis. They, like other wineries as well as local fair organizers, bring in fouee makers for special occasions, such as "portes ouvertes." If you want to learn something about fouees, I recommend you read the article I wrote for the Wall Street Journal. * The Wall Street Journal * SEPTEMBER 3, 2010 Soul Food à la Française Savoring fouée, the puffy, delicacy-stuffed bread, is a mouthwatering trip into France's distant past JACQUELINE FRIEDRICH

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