Bay of Fundy
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The Rise and Fall of the Bay of Fundy
Fishing boats resting on the ocean bottom is not an uncommon sight around the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia. The Bay of Fundy tides are a unique and destination worthy phenomenon – it’s claim to fame is having the highest tidal range in the world. The tides in this bay which lies between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick rise and fall upwards of 53 feet a day. Think about it – that’s equal to a 5-story building – a lot of water change in a matter of 6+ hours. To ultimately enjoy the Bay of Fundy I suggest you drive the Evangeline Trail. This route skirts the Bay of Fundy and it’s miraculous tides, as well as gives you a glimpse into the farming culture of Nova Scotia. We stopped in Digby, known as the scallop capitol of the world, and got our first taste of seafood and the changing tides. We went onward to the oldest town in the North America, Annapolis Royal, and enjoyed the small town, fort, and bay views. We continued through the fertile farming land of Annapolis Valley, and then turned towards the rocky coastline to have some fresh lobster in Hall’s Harbour while watching the tides drop in the harbor. We even took a detour off the Evangeline Trail and went towards Scott’s Bay where we could take a walk out on the bay floor during the low tide – a unique perk of this area! More Information: http://www.ottsworld.com/blogs/bay-of-fundy-tides/
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