Astrid Lindgrens Näs
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How a Farm Called Näs Inspired a Girl Named Pippi
Beloved children's author Astrid Lindgren was the second of Hanna and Samuel August's four children. Born in 1907 in a little red house on a farm called Näs in tiny Vimmerby, she and her siblings were given free reign to climb trees, jump in haystacks and generally revel in southern Sweden's lush countryside. Like the adventurous heroine who later made her famous, Astrid and her brothers and sister stored drinks in what became Pippi Longstocking's Lemonade Tree in her books. The old Elm still stands on the property, which was restored by the author before her death in 2000. Inside, you can see the rooms just as they were when Lindgren was a child. Romantic letters her parents wrote to each other, that may have encouraged all four children to pursue writing careers, also are on display. In a separate pavilion, "The Whole World's Astrid Lindgren" provides further insight into an author committed to children’s literature and children’s vulnerability, the environment, nature and democracy throughout her life. The permanent exhibit traces her hardships as an unmarried mother (scathing at the time) scraping by as a secretary before she married her boss, moved to Stockholm and began weaving a story starring a heroine named by her second child Karin that earned her worldwide fame. Guided tours of Näs are offered from March through mid-December. Self-guided audio-tours of The Whole World's Astrid Lindgren also are available.
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