An especially eclectic collection of reading this week. Enjoy!

Chet of Arabia,” The Atlantic
I spent last weekend in Wales at the Travel Classics conference, where I got to meet lots of writers and read their stuff. This was one of my favorite stories, about traveling to exotic places with kids, by Kayt Sukel (shown above). —Jeremy Saum 

The Yankee Comandante,” The New Yorker
David Grann’s story traces the participation of the role of an American, William Morgan, in the Cuban revolution. He was instrumental in helping Castro overthrow Batista. A completely fascinating story about the initial idealism and the drift to communism. —Jane Palecek

One Hundred Names for Love, Diane Ackerman
During my morning and evening commutes I’ve been slowly reading Diane Ackerman’s most recent book. “Savoring” might the wrong word to use about a book that chronicles coping with the effects of a life partner’s massive stroke, and I know that not all readers “relish” Ackerman’s hyperdescriptive prose the way I do. But savoring and relishing are recurring themes in Ackerman’s approach to life, and reading One Hundred Names for Love reminded me to revisit her blog. —Derk Richardson 

Anthony Bourdain Is All Over the Media Menu,” New York Times
Jeff Gordinier on Anthony Bourdain’s media saturation. —Davina Baum

A Night Out In New Orleans’ New Bohemia,” NPR’s The Record Blog
New Orleans is saying goodbye to The Music Box, a village of shacks transformed into playable instruments in the city’s once-flooded 9th Ward. But the project’s improvisational spirit lives on in the streets where limitless creativity has always thrived. —Serena Renner

Open Studios,” The Bold Italic
An inspiring roundup of some of San Francisco’s most creative graphic designers, furniture makers, and textile artists. —Julia Cosgrove

The Strip Mall vs. the Multi-Way Boulevard: In Consideration of Subtle Differences,” PlaceShakers and NewsMakers
Ooooh, street design and traffic management! —Jeremy Saum

A Walk on the Great Wall and a Chaser, Huffington Post
The Great Wall of China: not only is it visible from space, it’s a workout, too. —Jen Murphy

Painting Reality Sao Paolo,” Urban Shit
Inspired by Iepe Rubingh, an anarchic Dutch artist who was once jailed for creating traffic congestion in Tokyo, some artists threw paint on to a busy intersection in Sao Paolo and let the traffic do the rest. —Kareem Yasin

Map Wars: Why Maps Are Apple’s New Killer Feature,” Fast Company
Apple announces that it’s stepping into the heretofore Google-dominated realm of mobile mapping. Siri, how do I get to the airport from here? —Davina Baum

8 of the Best ‘Live Like a Local’ Experiences,” Boots n’ All
From camping with nomads in Tibet to a monthlong program that gives travelers a glimpse into the lives of Muslims, this article offers several intriguing ideas for unique experiences abroad. —Serena Renner

Photo by Kayt Sukel.