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The 6 Best Happy Hour Spots in Tel Aviv

Swanky cocktails, dramatic patios, street-party vibes—the Tel Aviv happy hour scene is buzzing

The world is rapidly catching on to Tel Aviv’s super-cool beach vibe and amazing modern cuisine. But there’s another charming aspect to the Israeli capital that’s less well-known outside the country: generous and lengthy happy hours. From artisanal speakeasies to dive bars in Jaffa, Tel Aviv has a happy hour to satisfy every taste. Here are six of the best.

1. Imperial Craft Cocktail Bar
Happy hour: Half-price drinks 6–8p.m., every night

One of the charms of this tucked-away speakeasy is just how un–Tel Aviv it is. Instead of beachside tank tops and informal service, Imperial Cocktail is stocked with pros dressed in bow ties and suspenders. There’s a comprehensive cocktail menu—the Honey Bunny with calvados, lemon, honey, and champagne is amazing—but the bartenders are also up for a challenge. Just tell them what you like (my instructions were simple: lots of ginger) and they’ll whip up something delicious. There’s also a short Asian fusion food menu, including terrific sweet-and-soy pork belly. —66 HaYarkon Street

2. Louis
Happy hour: 1+1 drinks and 50 % off food 4–9 p.m., every day

Welcome to an Israeli happy-hour idiosyncrasy: the “1+1” deal. Buy one drink and you get the next free—with the caveat that you have to finish the first before you get the second (so no splitsies). This bar is right across from historic Rabin Square—the site of Prime Minister Yitzak Rabin’s assassination, and current host to a wide variety of cultural events and protests. But most nights, it’s simply a very pleasant place to sit at one of the abundant outdoor tables alongside a youthful crowd. —4 Malkhei Yisra'el Street

3. Wineberg
Happy hour: Selection of drinks and tapas for 20 shekels (around $5) from 5–7:30 p.m., Sunday through Thursday

This wine bar isn’t on the prettiest strip in Tel Aviv (unless concrete and belching buses are your thing), but the vibe is pretty magical once you step inside. Amidst exposed brick and low lighting, Wineberg serves up big pitchers of sangria flavored with fresh mint and berries, plus a wide variety of tapas. Happy hour options include cocktails, beer, wine, and chasers, plus small plates like bruschetta with chicken liver pate and onion jam, or gnocchi with artichokes and goat béchamel. Wineberg is a pleasantly sophisticated place to sit, sip, and snack while the sun goes down. —106 Ben Yehuda Street

4. Saluf & Sons
Happy hour: Several items (including beer) are discounted 5–8 p.m., Sunday through Thursday

In the heart of the endearingly chaotic Levinsky Market—a mix of spice shops, dried goods, and cafes—this restaurant offers terrific modern Yemenite fare, from wonderful olive oil–kissed hummus to zesty lentil soup. (Don’t forget to try the zhug, a spicy cilantro sauce.) There are large wooden communal tables that almost lend the impression of a small Israeli beer garden. Other design touches are more intimate, including old family photos in mismatched frames and small cactuses in ornate pots. —80 Nahalat Binyamin Street

5. Hotel Montefiore
Happy hour: Discounted cocktails (with snacks) 5–7 p.m., every day

This small and charming boutique hotel, tucked away on a quiet, Bauhaus-lined street, has a great Vietnamese-French restaurant with an art deco bar and a fine sliver of patio shielded by dramatic white umbrellas. Enjoy a discounted glass of wine or beer or a fancy cocktail served alongside a generous offering of such canapés and nibbles as potato chips, olives, and bruschetta. Bigger appetites might be enticed by the plump gyoza or the tart tuna with yuzo. For those in need of a caffeine fix, coffee and tea is available, as are freshly baked scones. —36 Montefiore Street

6. Margoza Bar
Happy hour: 1+1 drinks 6–9 p.m., every night

The lovely seaside Jaffa neighborhood, a fascinating mix of crumbling facades and hipster haven, is full of terrific cafes with outdoor tables that line the cobblestone lanes. In the middle of Jaffa’s permanent flea market, where you can find everything from new rugs to antique Judaica, Margoza is a popular local fixture with an endearingly unfussy street-party vibe. Patrons—and sometimes their dogs, too—spill outside and mingle over pints of beer and the occasional shot of something stiffer. —3 Rabi Yochanan Street

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